Woodland Hill



Woodland Hill, adjacent and sandwiched between George/Cawnpore Street and Camden Hill Road, gradually became a residential road onwards from around 1880, with houses with names such as Cyprus Villas and Hillside, and as the road became more residential, the parade of houses were in Portland Terrace on one side and Chatham Terrace on the other. Unfortunately, the majority of houses in Chatham Terrace suffered bomb damage and were demolished, and the Paxton School playground extended to the site from Cawnpore Street.

Maps and Land Ownership
 

Stanford Map showing Woodland Road 1864

 

1870 OS Map Showing Woodland Hill

 

1898 OS Map Showing Woodland Hi

 

1919 OS Map Showing Woodland Hill

 
Timeline
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Building of the street
Woodland Hill, adjacent and sandwiched between George/Cawnpore Street and Camden Hill Road, gradually became a residential road onwards from around 1880, with houses with names such as Cyprus Villas and Hillside, and as the road became more residential, the parade of houses were in Portland Terrace on one side and Chatham Terrace on the other.  Unfortunately, the majority of houses in Chatham Terrace suffered bomb damage and were demolished, and the Paxton School playground extended to the site from Cawnpore Street.

Renumbering of houses in Woodland Hill

Renumbering of Woodland Road – courtesy of Lambeth Archives

 

Architecture

 

Street Furniture

Woodland Road Street Sign – photo courtesy of J. Ray Heard

 

Significant Street Buildings

    Garnham Stores

    GARNHAM STORES, 29 WOODLAND HILL AND MEMORIES Garnham Stores Woodland Hill One of the building casualties was The Garnham store at No 29, which was near Woodland Road on the Portland Terrace section. One childhood memory from a resident of No 32 Woodla …


Social History
BRIEF OUTLINE AND SOME OCCUPATIONS OF OCCUPANTS

Residents of Woodland Hill, mainly rented their properties, rather than own them.  In addition, they took in lodgers and boarders to help pay their rent.  Lodgers were friends in need of lodgings, or complete strangers that stayed for a limited period.  Some residents in Woodland Hill (as well as other local roads) were employed at the Crystal Palace.

The occupants of No 32, in the 1920s onwards, took in retired servants as lodgers that they had known in the area who were quite happy to move in with people they knew and not need a vast amount of living space.  Occupations of residents included Grocers, Gardeners, Butchers, Coachman, Dressmakers, Musicians, Grainer, Waiters, Journalists, Lodging House Keepers, Messenger at the Crystal Palace, Gas Fitter, Harness Maker, Fireman, Servants, Carpenter, Ironmonger, Nurse, Labourer, Wood Turner Plumber and Zinc Worker,

In 1911, aged 25, Harry Hanger, who played for Crystal Palace between 1909 and 1915 was a boarder at 12 Woodland Hill, along with George Garratt, who also played for Crystal Palace.

In 1871 there were three Cordwainers.  Cordwainers made new shoes only from new leather.

Charles Rogers (aged 38 from Fritwell, Oxfordshire) lived at No 6 Woodland Hill (Chatham Terrace) with his wife Susan (36) and daughter Emily (aged 4).

Charles Cronk (aged 46 from St Giles) lived at No 5 Woodland Hill (Chatham Terrace), with his wife Elizabeth (aged 4).

Also in 1871 at No 5 Woodland Hill and a Cordwainer, was Isaac Challcombe (aged 32 from Devon) (D 1875 aged 36)and his wife Annie (aged 34) and sons Frederick (aged 70) and Charles (9 months).

In 1891, Cordwainer, William Marshman (aged 58 from Wiltshire) (widower), lived at No 36 Woodland Hill with his son Samuel (aged 16) and daughters Winifred (aged 13) and Sarah (aged 11).  His three children were all born in Penge.

In 1871, at No 4 Chatham Terrace, Woodland Hill, lived a Whitesmith, Theodore Tucker (aged 42 from Exeter), his wife Isabella (aged 41) and their four children, Eliza (aged 19) who was a Servant, George (aged 9), Thomas (aged 4) and Lavina (aged 3). A Whitesmith is a person who makes and repairs things made out of tin or other light metals. Items such as forks, spoons, pans and candle holders.

Peter Piper (aged 72 from Malington, Essex) (Widower) was an Ostler/ Groom/Stableman.  He lived at No 8 Portland Terrace, Woodland Hill.

Also, in 1871, at No 4 Woodland Hill (Cottages), lived John D Pillinger (aged 36 from Somerset), with his wife Sarah (aged 34), daughter Florence (aged 11) and Adelaide (aged 9), and sons Walter (aged 10) and Ernest (aged 6).  John was a Portmanteau Maker, which is a large travelling bag, usually make of stiff leather and opening into two equal parts.

In 1871 Hugh Holden (aged 31 from Billingshurst, Sussex) was Blacksmith and Farrier, who lived at 3 Portland Terrace, Woodland Hill with his wife Emily Eliza (aged 31), Elizabeth (aged 6) and son James (aged 4).  Hugh’s father had also been a Blacksmith.  Hugh died in Wandsworth Workhouse Infirmary in 1912, aged 73.

In 1911, Sidney William Watson (aged 25 from Hertford), lived with his wife, Amy (aged 29 from Kilkenny, Ireland) and their son Ernest (aged 2), also a lodger, Harriet Pocock (aged 72, a Needlewoman from Edenbridge) at No 36 Woodland Hill.  Sidney was a Cowman on Farm for French’s Dairy.  He married Amy in Christ Church, Gipsy Hill in 1907.

The Ray family at No 32 were the first people to have electricity installed in Woodland Hill.  Mrs Ray had to encourage another resident to have it as well, otherwise the Electricity Board wouldn’t have laid a cable.  Finally, two or three neighbours decided to have it and the Electricity Company put in the power, but only as far as No 32, because Mr Robus next door, was a loyal worker for the gas company at Bell Green for forty-eight years.  The Ray’s got rid of the oil lamp and the gas lamps.

The telephone was put in when one of the sons, William, started work, approx. 1933 and their number was GIP 0995.  (Telephone numbers always began with the first three letter of the area, GIPsy Hill).  It was a black candle-stick stand type (upright) and was kept in the back room in a corner. It came with a directory, which didn’t have many names in it, although it was A-Z.

On the 30 November 1936, residents at No 32 noticed the bright orange glow in the house and thought it must have been a sunset, only to discover that the Crystal Palace was on fire.  The Crystal Palace was a huge, beautiful view on the horizon of many roads in Norwood and from afar.

Mr Ray was a Butcher, at Pulley’s, 35 Gipsy Hill, and Mrs Ray, a Dressmaker.

Theodore Robus was aboard the SS Strathallan during WW2, which was torpedoed in the Mediterranean Sea on 21 December 1942 with only a few survivors.  The Strathallan website says:

Somewhere on the ocean floor off Algeria in the Mediterranean Sea lies a once proud passenger liner. Whether it is lying on its port or starboard side or even erect we do not know…. but what we are aware of is a gaping hole at the water line on the port side caused by a torpedo from a German submarine which resulted in the liner capsizing. A few hundred nautical miles away on the same Mediterranean sea-bed there also lies a U-Boat sunk by depth charges. Both these wrecks are only two of thousands that litter the sea beds throughout the oceans of the world, testament to the famous saying by Scotland’s National Bard Robert Burns..” Man’s inhumanity to man”

The submarine was U562 built at Hamburg 1940. She had been on patrol in the Mediterranean Sea scouting for Allied shipping targets when she was depth charged and sunk by two British Destroyers.

The common denominator the hypothetical diver would not know about, U562 was the U-Boat that torpedoed and sank the graceful liner Strathallan at 2.30am on 21 December 1942 and then suffered the “Poetic Justice” of being depth charged and sunk by HMS Isis and HMS Hursley eight weeks later off the coast of Libya February 1943. On-board Strathallan were over 4000 British and American troops, 250 Queen Alexandra Military Nurses and 872 crew members including the Commodores of the Fleet Staff and Royal Navy DEMS Gunners. She was a mere 18 hours from port of disembarkation Algiers when the torpedo struck.

SS Strathallan – photo courtesy of Google

There was no publicity or news reports about the stricken ship. Obviously in wartime, information that could be useful to the enemy was severely censored.

Troops were dispersed, crews were re-allocated and people just got on with the war the Strathallan becoming just another war casualty of thousands where loss of life was a daily occurrence.

But she lived on in the memories of survivors. Here and there magazine and newspaper articles told the story of someone or other who was on-board Strathallan when the torpedo struck.

Because of the yearnings of 81-year-old former Leading Aircraftman Jim Gormley (RAF Regiment) of Kirkintilloch East Dumbartonshire, who was at the water line on G Deck when the torpedo exploded, to learn about the fate of the ship and casualties this Web Site has come into being. We have actual survivors reports and also people who were on convoy ships.

The Strathallan Story is dedicated to these fine men and women on-board who were on their way to war in North Africa as part of Operation Torch…. the invasion of Morocco…. Tunis and Algeria…. eventually pushing the Afrika Korp right out of the Mediterranean.

A special mention to Jim Gormley (survivor) has to be said who made this web site happen for posterity’s sake so that relatives around the world can learn about these extra-ordinary brave men and women and can share in the memories of their forefathers who contributed to saving the world from the horrors of Nazi Germany. We are indebted to Jim for his exclusive memories”.

On 19 June 1946, Dorie arrived back on the ‘Athlone Castle’ ship from Wellington, New Zealand.   This ship, in 1946, did round trips, repatriating troops to Australia and Singapore.

SS Strathallen – photo courtesy of Google

Advertisements for Woodland Hill

Wanted, by a practical working Gardener where two or more are kept, and where gardening is carried out with spirit.  12 years’ character – Address C.P., 5 Woodland Hill, Gipsy Hill, Norwood.

Norwood News August 1887

A Lady highly recommends her Daily Governess; acquirements : English, French, Music, Drawing, elementary Singing and Latin – Address C.G., 10 Woodland Hill, Gipsy Hill

Advert in the Norwood News for Watsham’s – Saturday, 9 May 1874

COLLARS. COLLARS. COLLARS.

Ladies and Gentlemen’s soiled COLLARS and Cuffs re-dressed equal to new, at 8d per dozen, at

  1. WATSHAM’S

9, Woodland Hill, Gipsy Hill, Upper Norwood

George Watsham (Bn 1845) Eliza (Bn 1851).  In 1891, they lived at 35 Woodland Hill and had five daughters and two sons.

Also in 1874 in the Norwood News, was an advert for Mr J B Hoare, Medical Galvanist at No 14 Portland Terrace, Woodland Hill.  A Medical Galvanist claimed “without acids or any saturation, without shock or unpleasant sensations, for the cure of nervous diseases and those arising from cold, an inactive liver, or sluggish circulation, and has been found highly beneficial in cases of rheumatism, sciatica, dyspepsia, neuralgia in all its forms, and general debility of the system. Mr Piggott’s Continuous Self-acting Galvanic Apparatus possesses the same peculiarities, requiring no acid or fluid of any kind, and can be regulated from almost an imperceptible degree to one of great power”.

Where an Invalid Lady or Gentleman desirous of receiving a systematic course of Galvanism

may be accommodated with apartments.

Terms on application – Single sitting from 2s 6d as heretofore”.

An Obituary for Woodland Hill

SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS WATSHAM (December 1908)

We regret to record the death of Mrs Eliza Watsham, wife of George Watsham, of Eureka Laundry, Woodland Hill, which took place quite suddenly on Tuesday morning, the cause of death being heart failure.

The deceased had not been in good health for a long time, although she continued to discharge her accustomed duties, and up to the hour of death was busy as usual.  We understand that about 10.30am, Mrs Watsham was doing some cooking and had the occasion to cross the courtyard at the back of the house.  On returning was seen to fall, and being assisted into the house, medical aid was summoned but life was extinct.

Deceased having been under medical treatment for some time, Dr D’Esterre was able to certify the cause of death, and consequently an Inquest was unnecessary.

Having been in business at Woodland Hill since 1874, Mrs Watsham was well known in Norwood and great sympathy is felt with Mr Watsham and family in their sad bereavement.  She rendered great assistance in the business and will be much missed in the home.  Possessing a kind heart and being of a generous nature, here advice and sympathy were frequently sought, while to her husband the loss is irreparable.

The funeral will take place on Monday at Norwood Cemetery at 3.30, the service being previously held at Christ Church, Gipsy Hill, conducted by Rev WTC Mould

Marriage in Woodland Hill

At No 7, Chatham Terrace, Woodland Hill, on the 1871 Census, lived Thomas Bates, a Plumber, (Bn 1845) aged 26, with his wife Agnes (aged 25) and their five month old daughter, Annie.  On the 1911 Census Annie has been married to Moses Davey (Bn 1872 D1955) for fourteen years (1886) and have three sons and two daughters and living at the Crystal Palace Fire Station on Crystal Palace Parade as Moses was a Station Officer for the Fire Brigade.

1911 Census Signatures

 

On the 1881 Census, at No 1 Woodland Hill, lived Mr Joseph Churchill, aged 45, a Coachman, with his wife Alice, aged 27.  They had a two year old daughter, Elizabeth (born in Norwood) who lived to the age of 101 (D1980).

Norwood News May 1879

Advert in the Norwood News for Watsham’s – Saturday, 9 May 1874

COLLARS. COLLARS. COLLARS.

Ladies and Gentlemen’s soiled COLLARS and Cuffs re-dressed equal to new, at 8d per dozen, at

  1. WATSHAM’S

9, Woodland Hill, Gipsy Hill, Upper Norwood

George Watsham (Bn 1845) Eliza (Bn 1851).  In 1891, they lived at 35 Woodland Hill and had five daughters and two sons.

Also in 1874 in the Norwood News, was an advert for Mr J B Hoare, Medical Galvanist at No 14 Portland Terrace, Woodland Hill.  A Medical Galvanist claimed “without acids or any saturation, without shock or unpleasant sensations, for the cure of nervous diseases and those arising from cold, an inactive liver, or sluggish circulation, and has been found highly beneficial in cases of rheumatism, sciatica, dyspepsia, neuralgia in all its forms, and general debility of the system. Mr Piggott’s Continuous Self-acting Galvanic Apparatus possesses the same peculiarities, requiring no acid or fluid of any kind, and can be regulated from almost an imperceptible degree to one of great power”.

Where an Invalid Lady or Gentleman desirous of receiving a systematic course of Galvanism may be accommodated with apartments.

Terms on application – Single sitting from 2s 6d as heretofore”.

At No 7, Chatham Terrace, Woodland Hill, on the 1871 Census, lived Thomas Bates, a Plumber, (Bn 1845) aged 26, with his wife Agnes (aged 25) and their five month old daughter, Annie.  On the 1911 Census Annie has been married to Moses Davey (Bn 1872 D1955) for fourteen years (1886) and have three sons and two daughters and living at the Crystal Palace Fire Station on Crystal Palace Parade as Moses was a Station Officer for the Fire Brigade.

On the 1881 Census, at No 1 Woodland Hill, lived Mr Joseph Churchill, aged 45, a Coachman, with his wife Alice, aged 27.  They had a two year old daughter, Elizabeth (born in Norwood) who lived to the age of 101 (D1980).

1925 Directory

Lawrence family in Woodland Hill

Street Party in Woodland Hill (Portland Terrace) – photo courtesy of Facebook

 

 

 

 

Residents

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Memories
GARNHAM STORES, 29 WOODLAND HILL AND MEMORIES
One of the building casualties was The Garnham store at No 29, which was near Woodland Road on the Portland Terrace section. One childhood memory from a resident of No 32 Woodland Hill, a few years ago, said “Shopping also formed part of our many adventures and we were encouraged to go shopping either across to Mrs Garnham Little General Stores, or Mrs Kirby’s shop on the corner. I was asked to go for a jar of Bovril, but being apprehensive, I didn’t want to go and said, “But I can’t say Bovril”, which made my mother laugh.

“Father went to the war and Ma and my brother spent much of our time with our grandparents in Barnfield Road [now Bristow Road]. One of my earliest recollections is being brought downstairs to the kitchen from my cot, being held in a blanket by Granny and seeing a Zeppelin in the searchlight. After the war had ended father came home with his many scars, he had travelled much and we lived back again in Woodland Hill.
Our own home, I remember, was comfortable and always full of laughter, comings and goings, people popping in for a game of cards or darts, shove h’penny (mother was a dab hand), or a chat. Even the wonderful warm evenings when cards were played in the garden, lit by numerous coloured jars with night lights and the gas from the oil lamp in the scullery. Modern amenities came later. The gas light with the ever breaking mantle and clogging burner – the galvanised bath on the kitchen floor in front of the stove, were later replaced by a bathroom and geyser put in by my father.
Father was a Jack of All Trades and from his first employ in Norwood as a Butcher at Pulley’s, No 35 Gipsy Hill and travelled around with pony and trap, which were kept in stables in Spooners Yard (opposite Beacondale Road). He loved horses and gained a Certificate of Merit for his grooming, to the advent of Pulleys garages which were built on part of the French’s Dairies – the barn being the big workshop”.
( Courtesy Norman Ray 2019)

War
The First World War 1914 to 1918

RIFLEMAN 45520/REGINAL ARTHUR LAWRENCE (Formerly 8/14396, 8Th T.R. Battn) Bn 1896 Upper Norwood.  In 1901 was living with his family at 78 Woodland Road.  In 1911, he was aged 15 and living with his mother Susannah, 3 brothers and two sisters, at 18 Woodland Hill.  He joined the Rifle Brigade, 12th Battalion. He was Killed in Action at Flanders on 31 August 1918 aged 22 years old.  He is buried at Sucrerie Cemetery, Ablain-St. Nazaire, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France.  His mother had already lost four children by 1911.

PRIVATE SIDNEY VICTOR AYLWARD/G1440  Bn 1895 to. Joseph (a Bricklayer) and Elizabeth.  Aged 3, he went to Woodland Road School.  In 1901 they were living at 46 Woodland Hill.  In 1911, aged 15, he was a Printer’s Apprentice and had three brothers and three sisters.  He joined 7th Battalion Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment.  He Died of Wounds on the Western Front on 2 July 1916 aged 20.  He is buried at Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L’Abbe.

His younger brother Hugh (a Painter by profession), was discharged with bullet wounds to his left arm (at Menin, France October 1918).  Hugh was declared physically unfit for further war service and sent to recover at the hospital at Denmark Hill, South London and then returned to 46 Woodland Hill (1919.

PTE FRANCIS JOSEPH WOODERS/42472, was born in 1880 to Joseph (a Baker D1901 aged 46) and Henrietta at 6 Chatham Terrace, Woodland Hill.  By 1901 they had moved to Streatham where he was also a Baker/Bread Maker (aged 20) and had a younger brother and three younger sisters.  He joined the Territorial Attestation Force/ T4/240713,Lancashire Fusiliers/240713 and later 2nd/7th Bt Manchester Regiment, where he was awarded the Victory Medal.  He was Killed in Action at Flanders on 21 March 1918, aged 34 and is remembered on Panel 64 – 67 Pozieres, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France.

PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLER HARRY HANGER

Played for Crystal Palace from 1909

PRIVATE HARRY HANGER L/90 was born in 1886 (Kettering, Northamptonshire) and was an English Professional Footballer, who began his career with Kettering Town and went on to play for Bradford City, Northampton Town and Crystal Palace .  At Crystal Palace he made 168 appearances in the Southern League and also made 10 FA Cup appearances.  He also played for Bradford City and made six FA Cup appearances.  In 1911, aged 25, he was a boarder at 12 Woodland Hill, along with George Garratt, who also played for Crystal Palace.

Harry Hanger

The Great War took a heavy toll on Palace. The club were not allowed to complete their 1914/15 home fixtures because the Crystal Palace and its grounds had been requisitioned by the Admiralty at short notice in February 1915.  Their captain, Harry Hanger, had already left for the frontline, while wingers Ben Bateman and John Whibley also went to serve their country.

Harry left Crystal Palace and saw active service (France and Flanders) from 6 October 1914.

It is believed Harry Hanger joined the British Army 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers, Private L/90 and was Killed in Action at Flanders on 23 March 1918.  His name is remembered on the Pozieres, Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France (Panel 3).

World War Two 1939 to 1945

PERCY ROBUS was born 19 October 1903.  His family lived at 30 Woodland Hill. He became a butcher and married Joyce Annie in 1903. Percy joined the Merchant Navy on HMS Avenger, a Royal Navy Escort Aircraft Carrier – Naval Auxiliary Personnel, but he was Killed in Action at sea, aged 39, in a converted aircraft while trying to land in South Africa during WW2 on 15 November 1942.  His name is remembered at the top of the second column on Panel 7, on the Memorial Panel in Liverpool.