Crystal Palace Station Road



Crystal Palace Station Road is situated on Anerley Hill opposite Palace Road. It once featured a short parade of shops on both sides, leading to Crystal Palace Low Level Station (built June 1854), beginning with the Brunswick Hotel Public House on the south corner with Anerley Hill. On the 1881 Census, only the Crystal Palace Low Level Station is stated, with the Smale family as the residing occupants. The Census for 1891 lists the premises along this short road. Apartments and premises are included on street directories and advertisements for 1887.

Maps and Land Ownership
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Timeline
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Building of the street
An article in the Norwood News on Saturday, 24 April 1875, states:

The road leading to the Crystal Palace Railway Station to be called Crystal Palace Station Road, and to extend from Anerley Road to the station.

It also stated that :

The attention of the Board was called to the inconvenience occasioned by ‘Anerley’ and ‘Upper Norwood’ being the postal names of different parts of the hamlet of Penge, the name ‘Penge’ not being recognised by the postal authorities.  The Board decided on the following alterations in the names of the streets in the hamlet:- the name of Anerley Hill to be abolished, the hill to be included as part of Anerley Road.

Until:

ANERLEY ROAD – ANERLEY HILL

Norwood News Friday, 1 October 1915

The committee reported : A vote of the ratepayers in the portion of Anerley Road situate between the top of the hill and Crystal Palace Station Road having been taken, and found to be almost unanimously in favour of altering the name of such part of Anerley Road to Anerley Hill, the committee recommended that such portion of Anerley Road be renamed to the occupiers of the houses on the north east side of such road between Ledrington Road and Crystal Palace Station Road, requiring them to number their houses 1 to 27 odd numbers inclusive.  No 1 to be Carlton Lodge at the corner of Ledrington Road.

The committee had been in communication with the Tramway Company with regard to the erection of a shelter by Anerley Bridge and had received a reply that the company regretted that the present time was inopportune to consider the question of shelters but doubtless they would be able to come to some arrangement with regard thereto after the war.

Compulsory Purchase Order 1953

Due to the destruction by bomb damage from a V1 on 11 July 1944 at 6:09pm, the land which once housed the shops and Brunswick Hotel received a Compulsory Purchase Order in 1953 and there now stands a short row of garages and Brunswick Court flats.

Norwood News Friday, 23 October 1953

URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL OF PENGE AND THE HOUSING ACT 1936 – 1952

Compulsory Purchase Order, 22 October 1953,

Vacant Land 2, 4, 6, 8 & 10 Crystal Palace Station Road and including,

1, 3, 5 & 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 Anerley Road and 1 – 7 Brunswick Place.

 

 

Architecture

Significant Street Buildings

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Social History
Morning Advertiser Wednesday, 8 July 1863

THE BRUNSWICK PUBLIC HOUSE at the corner of the road leading to the Crystal Palace Station, Sydenham, from which it is only one minute’s walk.

MR FRANK LEWIS will Sell by Auction, at the Mart, opposite the Bank of England, on Friday, August 14, at 1 precisely, the very valuable long LEASE and GOODWILL, with POSSESSION, of the above comfortable and well-appointed HOUSE.  It is of handsome elevation, most advantageously placed to command the trade of the many thousands of visitors to the Crystal Palace and other parts of this much-frequented and favourite neighbourhood, and is at the present time doing a very large business (which can be shown by the books) with every probability of considerable increase.  The lease will be for 120 years, at the moderate rent of £75.

Saturday, 11 November 1876

PARLOURMAID (thorough) in a gentleman’s family.  Wages £20 all found.  Good character.  Sydenham or Norwood preferred.  Address A.M., 4 Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood.

Norwood News 1879 & 1880

G.J. MAYHEW

LATE

MAYHEW AND MACDOUGALL

TAILORS

Having opened a SELECT PRIVATE TAILORING ESTABLISHMENT, at

5 Crystal Palace Station Road

Upper Norwood

Five doors down from the Low Level Station (L.B & S.C.R), ensure to those who may favour them with their Order, Military Fit, Durable

Norwood News Saturday, 19 February 1881

WANTED, Unfurnished Apartments; two or three rooms with attendance by a City Gentleman, in a healthy and agreeable neighbourhood – Address D.B.M., the Brunswick Bazaar, Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood.

Norwood News Saturday 26 September 1885

CAB STAND IN THE CRYSTAL PALACE STATION ROAD

The Committee have further considered the subject of the cab stand in the Crystal Palace Station Road and a letter (8 September) relating thereto, from the Chief Commissioner of Police, in which he states that, after careful enquiry, no other suitable site could be obtained for the stand and that complaint had been made as to the non-paving of the same and he requests that the Board would give directions for that work to be done.

The Committee recommend that the Commissioner of Police be informed that this Board deem the site now appointed for the standing to be a very objectional one, and that they propose to take over the repair of the Ledrington Road adjacent, by which his (the Commissioner’s) objection to a site in that road, as proposed by the Committee, will, it is understood, be removed

Norwood News Saturday, 17 December 1887

UNFURNISHED Apartments – Three good Rooms to Let in nice house;

Suit married couple or a dressmaker; use of scullery

Apply 2, Crystal Palace Station Road, Low Level

Norwood News Saturday, 24 December 1887

MORNING Governess – A Clergyman’s Daughter, with great experience, desires re-engagement at Christmas; thorough English, fluent French, German, advanced Latin, good music, Harmony, Counterpoint, Singing, Drawing; examination pupils prepared; highest testimonials – care of Miss Burghes, 4 Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood.

Norwood News 1887, 1888 & 1889

CONTINENTAL HOTEL

CAFÉ ET RESTAURANT

1 Crystal Palace Station Road

(Next Door to the Crystal Palace Station)

PROPRIETORS:

VELATI AND CO

Dinners served at Fixed Prices and ᾶ la carte

1/6 dinner daily

Soup, Fish, Joint, Sweets, Cheese

OPEN ALL DAY ON SUNDAY

Ladies’ Private Dining Room and Dining Saloon

Next door to the CP station L.B & S.C

Norwood News Saturday, 13 April 1889

A GIANT FROM CEYLON – The strongest, most delicious Golden-Tipped Broken Pekoe, specially selected from the best tea gardens in Ceylon, is sold at the absurdly low price of 1s 4d per pound.  Only to be had from the importers, The Neilgherry Pure Coffee and Tea Association, 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, close to Low Level Station. Those drinking this splendid Tea prefer it to any other variety and they save pounds per annum by using it.  It is equal to any 2s 6d tea in flavour and is only 1s 4d per lb.  Large samples sent free for six stamps.  

Woolwich Gazette 1897 – 1909

MESSRS WESTMORE YOUNG

AUCTIONEERS, VALUERS AND ESTATE AGENTS

11 Crystal Palace Station Road

(Opposite the Crystal Palace Low Level Station)

& 4 Furnival Street, Holborn, E.C.

Telephone Nos:- Norwood Office, 333 Sydenham., City Office, 4709 Holborn

Have the best Selection of all available Furnished and unfurnished Houses

in the neighbourhood of the Crystal Palace.

Rents Collected and Estates Economically managed.

Inventories prepared and checked, and Dilapidation Claims Assessed.

Mortgagees negotiated and Loans arranged on Furniture, &c.

Cycling Saturday, 24 June 1893

Premier Safety, Cushion Tyre, Non-slipping, new last April, strong machine, £9, 15s, a bargain.  N. Gherry, 8 Crystal Palace Station Road.

Norwood News Saturday, 4 March 1899

COMFORTABLE Apartments, within a few minutes’ walk of Penge, Anerley and Crystal Palace Stations – To Let, furnished, one or two bedrooms, also sitting room, (bath hot and cold); terms moderate – Apply by letter first, to M.S, 12 Crystal Palace Station Road.

Norwood News Saturday, 27 May 1905

FOR SALE

Lady’s Safety Bicycle, nearly new – Apply 9 Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood

Norwood News 1905/etc

NEWSAGENTS WHO SUPPLY

THE ‘NORWOOD NEWS’

UPPER NORWOOD

DAVIES, G.,      12 Crystal Palace Station Road

Russell & Co    12, Beulah Hill

Smith & Son, W.H       Low Level Station

Smith & Son, W.H       High Level Station

Smith & Son, W.H       Gipsy Hill Station

Smith & Son, W.H       51 & 53 Church Road

Compton, Mrs             12 Westow Hill

Nicholls, W.C              58 Westow Street

Nicholls, C.H.               78 Anerley Road

Nicholls, A                   88 Gipsy Hill

Norwood News Friday, 22 January 1915

£40 FOR TWO LOCK-UP SHOPS, prominent position – Write F., 7 Crystal Palace Station Road, Low Level, S.E.

Norwood News Friday, 18 March 1932

ANNE HOWARD

LADIES TAILORING

15 YEARS WEST END EXPERIENCE

LADIES’ OWN MATERIALS MADE UP

16 Crystal Palace Station Road, S.E.19

Norwood News Saturday , 12 December 1896

CROYDON COUNTY COURT

J Ratcliffe v. Nowroji, 5 Crystal Palace Station Road and 9 Lullington Road, Anerley.  Plaintiff claimed £1 7s 3d – Forthwith order.

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Saturday, 17 September 1898

A MYSTERIOUS ITALIAN Raggio Michele, an Italian ice-cream vendor, was charged on remand with attempting to pick pockets at the Crystal Palace on Thursday.  Prisoner had been remanded from Friday’s Court in order that the services of an interpreter might be obtained.  – Mr Velati of the Crystal Palace Station Road acted as interpreter.

Norwood News Saturday, 4 November 1899

ALLEGED SERIOUS ASSAULT ON AN OLD GENTLEMAN

George Alex Dawson, 9 Crystal Palace Station Road, was summoned for assaulting Mr Richard Henry Marshall, 15 Lullington Road.  Mr W Hood, solicitor, appeared for Mr Marshall and Mr Dees defended.

Mr Hood said his client, an old gentleman of 80 years of age, was too ill to attend, and he handed in a medical certificate.  He asked for an adjournment.  The old gentleman was suffering from a broken leg which it was suggested was the result of the assault.  He explained an incident in the proceedings.  The old man erroneously issued a summons against the brother of defendant.  He then withdrew this and issued it against the defendant.  In order to prove that they had the right man in the box, he called P.C. Read, who served the summons at one of Messrs Lyons’ stalls at the Crystal Palace, where he was employed.

Defendant, referring to the summons erroneously served on his brother, said “It was not my brother, it was me.  I knocked the old man over with his umbrella.”

Mr Hood, continuing, said the old man used to live with defendant’s parents.  For reasons immaterial to the point, he went away to the seaside, and when he returned went to live at Lullington Road.  It fell to his lot to frequently pass the defendant’s parents’ house and defendant had made the old man’s life unbearable by calling him names. 

A month ago at 10 o’clock at night defendant approached the old man, abused him and put himself in an antagonistic attitude towards him.  The old man put his umbrella up and said he could bear it no longer and would go to the magistrates, whereupon he was violently knocked down.  He had been in bed since with a broken leg and he believed that when the old man came before the Bench he would prove that the broken leg was the result of being knocked down.  He (Mr Hood) was not sure that the proceedings were rightly taken in the simple form, and whether defendant should not be charged with a more grave offence.  Assuming the old man died, there would be a charge of manslaughter at once.  He did not know at all yet whether he should not have to ask that defendant be indicted and sent for trial.

Mr Judd – Was it a case in which Mr Hood would like the man’s dispositions taken by a magistrate?

Mr Hood said it might be necessary, but he did not ask it then.  He asked that defendant be put on reasonable bail.

Mr Judd said, if necessary, one of the magistrates was prepared to go into the box and give evidence at that stage.

Mr Hood did not ask this.  Eventually defendant was remanded on bail for a fortnight, his father being surety.

Woolwich Gazette  Friday, 12 June 1903

A DISORDERLY DOMESTIC

Sophia Louisa Rowland of 3 Crystal Palace Station Road, Anerley, servant, was charged at Penge on Saturday with behaving in a disorderly manner.  It appeared that prisoner went to a house where she had formerly resided in Crystal Palace Station Road, to claim some property and created a disturbance.  She admitted that she had just come out of prison and the bench decided to bind her over to be of good behaviour for six months.

Runcorn Examiner Saturday, 19 December 1903

Complexion Beautified, wrinkles prevented, lovely soft skin; sample bottle sufficient for weeks 1s 6d – ROBERTS, 12 Crystal Palace Station Road, London

Woolwich Gazette Friday, 15 April 1904

BREAKING A TOBACCONIST’S WINDOW

George Downing, 23, no home, was charged with breaking and entering 15 Deptford Bridge and stealing a tobacco box, the property of Herbert Goldsmith.  There was a second charge of wilfully damaging the window, value £20. – Prosecutor who lives at 6 Crystal Palace Station Road, Anerley, said the premises were left safe on Saturday night, and early Sunday morning he was called by the police.  He found that the window had been broken with a brick and a tobacco box had been taken away.

Norwood News Friday, 25 June 1920

EXTRAORDINARY DOINGS IN AN ANERLEY KITCHEN

SERIOUS ALLEGATIONS AGAINST A YOUNG MAIDSERVANT

The magistrates on Monday at Penge Police Court were occupied a considerable time in hearing a remarkable charge against Ann Louisa Vidler, aged 16, 10 Lime Tree Avenue, Jasmine Grove, Anerley, a domestic servant.  She was accused of causing grievous bodily harm to Mrs Fanny Elizabeth Reed by striking her on the head with some blunt instrument on June 15, and further with stealing from a handbag in a cupboard a £1 Treasury note and a 10s Treasury note, the property of Mr F W Reed.

Mrs Fanny Elizabeth Reed 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood, the wife of Frederick Reed, a confectioner, said she first met the accused on June 9, when she had come after a place and was sent by the Labour Exchange from Penge.  Witness said she had not been to the Labour Exchange.  The girl had the address correct.  She told the accused she happened to be in want of a maid.  She made enquiries as to references and wrote to an address in Anerley Park and received a reply.  The references being satisfactory, she engaged accused from the following Monday – a week ago that day.  She was to live out. 

She started work on Monday morning and everything went well till the Tuesday afternoon.  The accused’s home was Lime Tree Avenue, Jasmine Grove.  On Tuesday witness was in the kitchen downstairs and was commencing to cut the bread and butter for tea.  The accused was there also, but no one else.  The accused was getting the cups on the tray to take upstairs.  She distinctly passed behind the witness and she was then between the fireplace and witness.  Witness could not see what the accused was doing.  She felt a terrific crash on her head and she jumped up and said “Good heavens, Annie, something has fallen on my head.”  It was a heavy blow.  The accused made no reply.  Nothing could have fallen on her head excepting the ceiling; there was nothing to fall.  Witness said to the girl “You are a bad, wicked girl, Annie, you did that.”  The girl held out her hands and said “I have nothing in my hands, how could I have done it?”

The Assistant Clerk : If the girl hit you on the head with such force, why did the blow not stun you?

Witness : I was wearing a hair pad.

The accused said she would go upstairs and fetch the master and did so; she also said she would go home to her mother.

The girl came downstairs again and offered to bathe witness’ head, but she declined this, being afraid for her to touch her.  Witness went and fetched her husband.  He said something must have come through the window, but the window was tightly closed.  Witness, on looking around to see if anything had fallen, missed a flat iron from the mantlepiece and asked accused where it was.  It was missing and was so still; she told the accused that it must be found.  Witness told the accused that was what she hit her with and that she must find it.  Witness tried to find several doctors but failed; at last she found Dr Scott Turner, who advised her to get back into the cab and go to the Norwood Cottage Hospital.  The hair pad referred to was not indented before the blow as it now was.  Her injuries were dressed at the hospital by matron, but she was not detained as an in-patient owing to want of room.  She had been going to the hospital every morning since. 

Just before going downstairs to cut the bread and butter, she left some money in a cupboard in a room behind the shop – a £1 note, 10s note and 24s in silver.  The accused had access to this room.  On the particular day of the blow, witness sent the accused to the cupboard for a pair of scissors.  After the accused had been to the cupboard witness went later and found the money still there.  Witness had not seen the girl since she (witness) went out to look for the doctor until that morning in court.

Frederick William Reed, 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, said on the day in question –  June 15 – he was very busy about tea time.  The dog barked furiously and rushed up after the girl.  He told her to keep it quiet; it was so agitated.  The girl did not come into the shop.  His wife in a few minutes’ time rushed up and said “Look at my head, it’s all blood.”  He went down into the kitchen to see how it happened.  No panes in the window were broken.  The accused was there and seemed wandering about.  He suggested his wife should go to the chemist at once and she did so and then went after a doctor.  The girl began to fidget about and wanted to go home and eventually did so.  She asked if she might take a book to read.  Before he could answer she was down on her knees at the cupboard taking out some novelettes.  He imagined that was when she took the money.  His wife was kept at the hospital till 10 o’clock.  He wrote to the police that night and a detective came in the morning.

The Clerk : Has the girl been to the shop since?

Witness said she came the next morning about eight, but he would not admit her.  He was afraid to have her in the house by himself.  He could not trace the missing iron.  He could not say how it disappeared.

She had left with the books – novelettes – but he saw nothing of the iron.

Detective Sergeant Ottoway said at 1pm on Wednesday, 16 June, he went to 2 Crystal Palace Station Road.  He visited the basement kitchen and saw a quantity of blood stains on the kitchen table; the table was 6ft from the mantlepiece.  At 5pm on Sunday, he saw the accused at Portsmouth Police Station and told her he was a police officer, and should arrest her for causing grievous bodily harm to her employer, Mrs Reed, on Tuesday, 15 June, by striking her on the back of the head with a blunt instrument; also with stealing a £1 Treasury note and a 10s Treasury note from a cupboard.  She said “I understand.”  At Gipsy Hill Police Station, when charged, she said “Right O.  They will have to prove it.”  He made a thorough search for the missing iron but failed to trace it.  The accused lived at 10 Lime Tree Avenue, Jasmine Grove, Anerley.  Her father was present in court.

At this stage, the case was remanded till the following date for medical evidence.

DISCOVERY OF THE FLAT IRON

At the resumed hearing on Tuesday, Detective Sergeant Ottoway produced a flat iron.

Mrs Reed swore it was hers and the one that was missing.

Detective Sergeant Ottoway stated that at 1pm on the previous day he made a further search of the premises, 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, and under a disused water cistern at the top of the house found the flat iron now produced.

Dr J.A. Howard said he examined the prosecutrix at the Cottage Hospital.  She had a scalp wound at the back of the head, about 1 ½ inches long, which had bled profusely.  He put in one stitch.

The Magistrate’s Clerk asked the doctor to express an opinion how the injury was caused.

Dr Howard : By any blunt instrument.  It could easily have been done by something falling on the head.

Detective Sergeant Ottoway asked if the wound could have been done by a flat iron.

Dr Howard : Yes, by any blunt instrument.  It was not a cut.

R William H Aston, sub postmaster, Beckenham Road, Penge, said he knew the accused by sight.  She was a depositor at the Savings Bank.  One day last week she opened an account with a pound Treasury note.  He thought it was on the Tuesday evening.  She asked him to retain the book.  This was unusual, but he did so.  The next morning she asked for the pound back; he said this was impossible under four clear days.  He gave her the book.

The accused said she desired to make a statement and said Mrs Reed asked her about 5pm to fill the kettle.  She was absent for a quarter of an hour, in which time she heard a fall on the fender.  When she returned to the kitchen Mrs Reed had a handkerchief on the table all stained and was holding a tea towel to her head.  She accused witness of striking her on the back of the head.  She remarked to her husband that she was stunned and could not remember everything.

The accused was committed for trial at quarter sessions, opening on July 1.

Norwood News Friday, 2 July 1920

THREE YEAR SENTENCE

The case in which a sixteen year old servant named Ann Louisa Vidler of 10 Lime Tree Avenue, Jasmine Grove, Anerley, was charged with maliciously wounding her mistress, Mrs Fanny Elizabeth Reed, of 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood, was fully investigated at the West Kent Quarter Sessions, Maidstone, on Thursday.

The girl, who was undefended, was indicted on three crimes with (1) maliciously wounding prosecutrix, (2) doing grievous bodily harm, or (3) a common assault.  A further indictment also charged her with stealing £1 and 10s in Treasury notes from Mrs Reed.

She pleaded not guilty on each indictment.

A HIDDEN FLAT IRON

The story showed that the prosecutrix who, with her husband, carries on a confectionery business at No, 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood, was cutting some bread and butter on June 15, when the prisoner was the only other person in the room.  Suddenly, Mrs Reed received a blow at the back of the head and having looked round to see what caused it, could see nothing and accused the girl, saying “You bad, wicked girl, you have done this.”  The girl holding out her hands, denied it and said she would go and fetch the master.  She ran upstairs but returned without Mr Reed.  Later it was discovered that a flat iron was missing from the mantlepiece and subsequently this was found hidden under a disused cistern at the back of the house.  After the removal of Mrs Reed to the hospital and the prisoner had left, it was found that the Treasury notes in question were missing from a bag in a cupboard, and the same evening prisoner opened a banking account at the local post office by depositing £1.  She was later arrested at Portsmouth.

THE GIRL’S STORY

Prisoner, giving evidence, said she was sent out to fill the kettle and during her absence she heard a fall.  Upon her return a blood stained handkerchief was on the table and Mrs Reed was holding a tea cloth on her head.

Under cross examination, prisoner admitted running upstairs, but denied that it was to hide the iron.  With reference to the money, a chum of hers had £8 and gave her £3, and it was one of these notes that she deposited in the bank.  She admitted being out of employment for about a month before she got that position, and only had a couple of shillings left.

The jury found her guilty of a common assault and also guilty of stealing.

Prisoner still strongly protested her innocence

AN INDIFFERENT RECORD

Sergeant Ottaway, in giving evidence of character, said she had never been charged before, but on July 9 last, stole £10 from her father’s house, and was found later at Burgess Hill, in Sussex.  She had had five situations since she left school, including the Maple Dye Works at Penge, from which she had been discharged because of the state of uncleanliness; at No 2 Anerley Park, Upper Norwood; at 205 Anerley Road; and also at Deal.  At the latter place she had a fair character as to industry.  Her father said she had given him a great deal of trouble and he had thrashed her.

The Chairman admonished the girl for her crime and told her it was a very merciful thing that she was not in another court on a far more serious charge.  The Bench were anxious for her future and she would be given a chance to start life honestly after three years at a Borstal institution. 

The sentence therefore was three years at Borstal.

Norwood News Friday, 27 August 1920

ASSAULT ON AN ANERLEY MISTRESS

At the Court of Criminal Appeal on Wednesday, the application of Ann Louisa Vidler, who was convicted at the West Kent Sessions of common assault and larceny, and sentenced to three years at Borstal, was dismissed.

It appeared that she entered the servicer of a Mrs Reed at Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood, as a servant.  On the following day she assaulted her mistress by striking her on the head, and later money in notes was taken.  She appealed against the conviction and sentence, but there were no grounds in the opinion of the Court for interfering, and the appeal was dismissed.

Norwood News Friday, 17 June 1921

DEATH TRAP LESSENED – The removal of the derelict cab shelter in the Ledrington Road is a distinct improvement, and should do something to prevent cycle accidents so frequent in the Crystal Palace Station Road adjoining.

West London Observer Friday, 27 December 1929

MOTORIST LOSES HIS COAT

Observation kept by the police on a shrubbery in Paddington, led to the arrest of two men, George Henry Prince, 34, of Harrow Road and Bernard Mitchell, 34, of Chapel Street, Marylebone, and their committal for trial at the Marylebone Police Court last Saturday on a charge of stealing a leather motor coat from the motor-car of Mr William Best, a man of independent means, residing at 10 Crystal Palace Station Road, SE19.

Mr Best said he left the car outside No 49 Westbourne Terrace, Hyde Park, about seven o’clock in the evening and missed the coat when he returned.  He immediately reported the loss to the police.  About two hours later PCs Grant and Smith were keeping watch at Westbourne Terrace when they said they saw the prisoners loitering.  Mitchell entered a shrubbery, while Prince stood by and a few minutes later Mitchell came out with the leather coat, which he handed to Prince.  When told the coat answered to the description of the one reported stolen, Prince exclaimed “Gor Blimey, I thought we would get caught.”  He added that Mitchell had pinched the coat from a car and added, “I went back with him to get it.”  Prince told the magistrate that Mitchell offered him the coat in a public house and then took him to it in the shrubbery and gave it to him.

Norwood News Friday, 23 May 1941

NORWOOD SEARCH FOR CONVICT

Following a report that a man resembling Stanley Thurston, who escaped from Dartmoor about two months ago, had been seen in a shelter near Crystal Palace Station Road, Upper Norwood.  Police made an extensive search of the shelters in the district during the early hours of Wednesday morning.  The man was not found, however.

He was dressed in a brown sports jacket and grey flannel trousers, and a warden noticed that he looked like Thurston.  When the warden questioned him, he ran away.

Norwood News Friday, 31 January 1958

KIOSK RAIDED

Thieves who broke into the tobacco kiosk in Crystal Palace Station Road, Anerley, over the week-end, stole chocolates and a

paraffin lamp.

Who lived in Crystal Ppalace Road and what were their occupations?

South Side

2 Crystal Palace Station Road

1891  Julie Matilda Davy (Bn 1848 D1910).  She was a widow.  Her husband John had been a Carpenter/Builder (M1872).  She was living at 2 Crystal Palace Station Road with her children, May Davy (Bn 1877) who married and emigrated to Canada, Helene (Bn 1878), Herbert (Bn 1880), Harry (Bn 1882).  During WW1, he served in New Zealand and died there in 1921.  Percy (Bn 1883) and John Jnr (Bn 1889).  During WW1 he served in Canada, where he died in 1947.

Also at 2 Crystal Palace Station Road in 1891, was Alfred Culpin (Bn 1851) his wife Martha (Bn 1853) Living on their Own Means, and their son Alfred (Bn 1889) who on the 1939 Census, is working for Customs & Excise.  He married Louisa Hextall in 1911.

1901  William Coles, aged 34, Confectioner, with his brothers Thomas (aged 33) and Arthur (aged 31) and their sisters, Annie (aged 37) and Emily (aged 36).

1911  At No 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, was George Edwin Taylor (Bn 1865 Dublin) and his wife, Emma (Bn 1874).  They ran the Confectioner’s Shop and had two sons, George Edwin Junior (Bn 1907 D1924 aged 17) and William Albert (Bn 1909).

1911  Occupying 2 rooms, was George Dellow (Bn 1841 D1919) and his wife, Ellen (Bn 1842).  He had been employed at Crystal Palace Railway Station since May 1874 and in 1911 was on a weekly wage of 16 shillings at Crystal Palace Low Level Station.  In 1861, when he was 19, he was a lodger in the railway porter’s cottage, Grateley Station, Hampshire.

4 Crystal Palace Station Road

1891  John Burgess (Bn 1859 D1943) Fancy Repository and his wife Kate (Bn 1857 D1902).  When John married Kate in 1880, he was a Corn & Flour Merchant in Islington.

In 1891, their family was son Percy (Bn 1882 D1932) who, in 1911 was a Draughtsman,

Lily Kate (Bn 1885) and twin daughters, Bn 1891.  Kate’s mother Arabella Schofield (Bn 1918 D1894) was also living with them.

1887

Also at 4 Crystal Palace Station Road, was Mrs Ellen Norman (Bn 1841) and her daughter Ellen Norman (Bn 1856).

1901  Rene Lecomte (Bn 1853 France) (aged 48) and his wife Virginie (aged 36) ran the Restaurant/Coffee House.

Davies, Neilgherry and Dimmock names visible in this photo

Neilgherry’s were at different numbers between 1887 and 1903

including No 2, No 5 and No 8 (1903)

1911 Richard Dimmock (Bn 1885 ), his wife Naomi (Bn 1881) were the proprietors of Union Jack Dining Rooms at 4 Crystal Palace Station Road on the 1911 Census, with their 11 month old daughter, Vera.  They also had six Boarders from Belgium, who were all Plasterers, most likely working at the Festival of Empire at the Crystal Palace.

Directory 1915

6 Crystal Palace Station Road

1901 & 1911 Mr Herbert Goldsmith (Bn 1863 D1935) and Mrs Edith Sarah (Bn 1872) married in1899 when he was a Cigar Importer.  In 1878, aged 14, he was an Apprentice in the Merchant Navy for four years.  On both the 1901 and  1911 Census, they run the Tobacconist Shop at 6 Crystal Palace Station Road.  In 1901, they have a Domestic Servant Amy Caroline Orgles, aged 15.

In 1911, they lived with their two sons James Howard (Bn 1902) and Douglas William (Bn 1910).

8 Crystal Palace Station Road

1901  Thomas William Munn (Bn 1868) (age 33) Tea Dealer and Coffee Rooms at 8 Crystal Palace Station Road, with his wife Emily (aged 42) (M1896).  Living with them were his two step daughters, Bertha (aged 19) and Gladys (aged 16).  Bertha was a Draper’s Assistant and Gladys, a Domestic Servant.  They also had their daughter Winifred (aged 3) and son Rowland William (Bn 6 June 1900).

1902

By 1911 they had moved to 59 Belvedere Road.  When son Rowland was an 18 year old Grocer’s Assistant (1918), he joined the 27th TR Battalion.  He married Doris in 1928.  From 1938 to 1939, he joined the 51stBedfords.  In 1939, he became a Cinema Attendant in Worthing.

1911  At No 8, was Sophia Coleman (Bn 1845 D1916).  She had been married to Joseph (1883) who had been a Farmer from Dorset, but he died in 1893.  Sophia’s son, Charles (Bn 1884) ran the Coffee & Tea shop at No 8. Sophia also had a daughter, Mabel (Bn 1886).

Directory 1915

10 Crystal Palace Station Road

From at least 1887 to 1900, No 10 was Antonio Velati’s Café and Restaurant.

1901  William Charles Norman (Bn 1855 D1926) aged 46 and his wife Emma (aged 45 Bn in Warwick Lighthouse) and their two sons, Harry (aged 19) and Frank (aged 17).  He was the Crystal Palace Low Level Station Master from 1901 to at least 1908.  In 1891 and 1911 he was the Station Master at Tunbridge Wells and in 1900 Thornton Heath Railway Station.

1911  Mr George Davies (Bn 1857 D February 1924) Fruiter and Greengrocer, and his wife Alice (Bn 1861) were at No 10.  They married in Hackney in 1886.  In 1891 she lived with her father William and mother, Eleanor, who were the Licensed Victuallers at The Tulse Hill Hotel, Norwood Road.  In 1901, they were living at 34 Colby Road.

Also living with George and Alice in 1911, was Alice’s mother, Eleanor Lincoln (aged 70 Bn 1839 D1935 aged 95) and Widower, Thomas Mumford (aged 64), Boarder.

Directory 1915 & 1920

Norwood News Friday, 1 February 1924

WELL KNOWN TRADER’S DEATH – Mr George Wallace Davies, Fruiter,

Crystal Palace Station Road, has died suddenly in the Peckham district, and an Inquest will be held to-day (Friday) at Wanless Road.  He had been in this district for many years and was much respected.

18 Crystal Palace Station Road

1891  Paul Roux Schrὂder (Bn c1854/1858 Stellenbosch, Cape Colony/Cape of Good Hope) and his wife Alice had been living at 25 Anerley Road where he is an Oyster Merchant.  He is also in the directory at the Oyster Rooms, 18 Crystal Palace Station Road.

Paul Roux Schrὂder joined Merchant Navy stating the age of 19 in 1874 for 4 years and qualified as a Second Mate on 13 August 1879.

Kelly’s Surrey Trade Directory 1891

For Paul Roux Schrὂder(Senior)

1900

In 1901, they are living at 38 Palace Road.  His occupation was An Oyster Merchant Fisherman.

1901 Census : 12, 14, 16 18 Crystal Palace Station Road  All Unoccupied.

In 1900, No 14 was Blundell’s Florist.  They also had a florists in Westow Street.

Crystal Palace Railway Station (Low Level)

A direction sign for London Brighton & South Coast Railway

CRYSTAL PALACE LOW LEVEL STATION

on Crystal Palace Parade

[Source : Book:  Emile Zola Photographer in Norwood 1898-1899]

Since May 1874, George Dellow (Bn 1841 D1919) had been employed at Crystal Palace Railway Station as an Attendant.  He had a weekly wage of 16 shillings.  He lived with his wife, Ellen (Bn 1842).  In 1911, they lived at No 2 Crystal Palace Station Road (2 rooms).

1881  The only information stated for Crystal Palace Station Road on the 1881 Census is the LB & SC Railway Station, for the Smale family:

William Henry Smale (Bn 1822  D1882) (aged 59) is the Railway Official, with his wife Harriett (M1851) Harriett Bn D1894) and daughter Geraldine (Bn 1860) (aged 21), and

Son Horatio (Bn 1872) (aged 9) whose occupation later in life was a Railway Clerk.

1891  John Ruffell and his wife Mary (both aged 46) and their six daughters.  He was the Station Master.

1901  William Charles Norman (Bn 1855 D1926) aged 46 and his wife Emma (aged 45) and their two sons, Harry (aged 19) and Frank (aged 17).  He was the Crystal Palace Low Level Station Master from 1901 to at least 1908.  In 1891 and 1911 he was the Station Master at Tunbridge Wells and in 1900 Thornton Heath Railway Station.

1911  Horace William Eastland (Bn 1864 D1943) was the Station Master and his wife Frances Mary (Bn 1865).  They had a son, Frank (Bn 1888), who became a West Croydon Railway Station Railway Clerk.  He married Ethel (Bn 1890).

Directory 1910

Mr & Mrs Eastland

Station (Railway) Low Level Station

Crystal Palace

(1911 Census)

North Side

You can see No 1 Crystal Palace Station Road (North Side corner with Anerley Road)

(David Porter’s Bakers & Confectioners)

This area is now open green space, following bomb damage in 1944.

1 Crystal Palace Station Road 

In 1891, David Porter (Bn 1838 D1919) aged 53, was a Baker and Confectioner in a building called The Red House on Anerley Road, adjacent to the Brunswick Hotel, with his wife Emma (Bn 1848) aged 43 and their children, Florence (aged 13) Kate (aged 12) Laura (aged 6) Elsie (aged 4) Lena (aged 2) and a Servant Maud (aged 15).  David and Emma married in 1876 when he was a Widower and a Shipping Clerk.  His father had been a Bookbinder.  Emma’s father had been a Baker.  In 1879, David Porter was a Jeweller’s Assistant.

By 1900, they were residing at 1 Crystal Palace Station Road, as Bakers/Confectionery and Pastries.  Daughter Lena (Bn 29 January 1889) attended Woodland Road School in 1895.

He is listed at 1 Crystal Palace Station Road in the 1887 Directory.

1900 Street Directory

In 1911 (6 rooms), they still run the Baker’s Shop at 1 Crystal Palace Station Road.  Daughters Laura, is a House Assistant, Elsie and Lena are Postal Clerk

Bakers, Confectioner, Post & Telegraph Office.

1920

3 Crystal Palace Station Road 

1891  Georgiana Barlow (Bn 1833 D1903).  She married Thomas (Bn 1834 D1881) in 1857, who was an Agricultural Labourer/Shepherd in Gt Marlow, Buckinghamshire.

Georgiana lived at 3 Crystal Palace Station Road with her daughters Catherine (Bn 1858 D1894) and Clara (Bn 1868 D1906).  They were all Dressmakers,

Also, John Horton (Bn 1862 D1925) Gardener at the Crystal Palace, wife Eliza (Bn 1847 D1926 37 Palace Road).  They married in 1890, when he was living at 5 Palace Road.  His father had been a Blacksmith.  In 1911, they were living at 37 Palace Road.

1901  Richard Heath (Bn 1843 D1913) a Carver and Gilder, and his wife, Lavinia (Bn 1838 D1905) (M1871) were at 3 Crystal Palace Station Road.

Also, Mr William James Warwick, aged 26 (Bn 1876) a Coachman, lived with his wife Beatrice (aged 21)(M1900).  Aged 15, he joined the Merchant Navy.

In 1911,they were living in Thornton Heath and he was a Motor Instructor/Mechanic and had eight children.

In 1915, when they were living at 60 Ridsdale Road, Anerley, he enlisted (Pte 130953 Royal Army Service Corp).  He was 5’ 7”, aged 39.  He attended the medical at 51 Church Road, Upper Norwood.

During WW2, their son, Pte S/148726, Royal Army Service Corp Albert Cecil (Bn 13 October 1906) was aboard the RMS Lancastria which was sunk under enemy attack on 17 June 1940.

He is remembered at the Dunkirk Memorial.

3 Crystal Palace Station Road

1911  Charles Arthur Brooks (Bn 1857) was an Auctioneer’s Clerk and up until 1910 had been living at 63 Palace Road.

5 Crystal Palace Station Road

1891  Mr Charles White, a Mercantile Clerk, was resident with his wife, Justina (both aged 38) with their three children and two German Boarders, who were Waiters.

1901  Lived Samuel Bassett (aged 54) and his wife Emily (aged 52), three children and his wife’s mother Eliza (aged 84) (Bn 1817).  He was a Manager of an Oil Shop.  In 1891, they lived at 17 Anerley Road and in 1871, at 14 Brunswick Parade, Anerley Road (Manager of an Oil Shop).  Also living there, was George Mitchell, aged 33, a Retired Tutor.

7 Crystal Palace Station Road 

1901  Arthur A Buckhurst (Bn 1867) a Roller Skate Maker.  In 1891 living in Hammersmith, his occupation was Professor of Skating.  He married Florence (aged 26) in 1895.

1911 Henry Fillingham (Bn 1837) aged 74, Bootmaker and his wife Emily (Bn 1853) aged 58.  They had two Boarders, Laura Jane Handford (Bn 1857) aged 54 a Cook, and Joseph Lamprell (Bn 1899) aged 22, a Gardener.

9 Crystal Palace Station Road 

1901  George Dawson (Bn 1841) aged 60, a Carpenter, and his wife Amelia (aged 40) and their four children.  Amelia Dawson was a Wardrobe Dealer.  One of their sons, Herbert Francis (Bn 1888 D1956) joined the Royal Air Force in 1917.  Service No 90604.

In 1911, lived Felix Vincent Alexander Pollon (Bn 1883 D1918 Flanders) aged 29.  He was the Manager of the Tailors at 9 Crystal Palace Station Road.  He had one son, Frederick Albert (Bn 28 November 1909).  Also resident was Herbert Fitzsimons, Widower (Bn County Cork) aged 44, a Canadian Exhibition Commissioner.

Felix enlisted in the Army Cyclist Corp aged 32, when he had been a Waiter, living in Stockwell Park Gardens in 1915 and later joined the East Yorkshire Regiment, 10th Battalion.  He was wounded on 25 April 1918 and on 30 July 1918, he was promoted to Sergeant.  Regimental No: 36626, formerly 11287, ACC.  He was 5’ 7”.

He was Killed in Action at Flanders, on 30 September 1918, aged 35.

He left behind Widow, Louisa (M 1 January 1907) and three sons, Frederick Albert (Bn 28 November 1909), Phillip Albert (Bn 14 February 1911) and Robert (Bn 27 July 1917).

He is buried at Underhill Farm Cemetery, Comines-Warneton, Arrondissement de Mouscron, Hainaut, Belgium.

9 Crystal Palace Station Road 

Also at No 9, were Harry Dobbin (Bn 1880) aged 30, his wife Elsie (aged 26) and their son, Harry Ralph (aged 3).

In 1901, Harry is the Licensed Victualler at the Swan Hotel, Westow Hill.

11 Crystal Palace Station Road 

Charles Langley (Bn 1881) (aged 30) Auctioneer’s Clerk and his wife Florence (aged 29) with their son Dudley (Bn 1909) and daughter Marjorie Florence (Bn 1910).

 

 

 

 

 

1891  Julie Matilda Davy (Bn 1848 D1910).  She was a widow.  Her husband John had been a Carpenter/Builder (M1872).  She was living at 2 Crystal Palace Station Road with her children, May Davy (Bn 1877) who married and emigrated to Canada, Helene (Bn 1878), Herbert (Bn 1880), Harry (Bn 1882).  During WW1, he served in New Zealand and died there in 1921.  Percy (Bn 1883) and John Jnr (Bn 1889).  During WW1 he served in Canada, where he died in 1947.

 

Also at 2 Crystal Palace Station Road in 1891, was Alfred Culpin (Bn 1851) his wife Martha (Bn 1853) Living on their Own Means, and their son Alfred (Bn 1889) who on the 1939 Census, is working for Customs & Excise.  He married Louisa Hextall in 1911.

 

1901  William Coles, aged 34, Confectioner, with his brothers Thomas (aged 33) and Arthur (aged 31) and their sisters, Annie (aged 37) and Emily (aged 36).

 

1911  At No 2 Crystal Palace Station Road, was George Edwin Taylor (Bn 1865 Dublin) and his wife, Emma (Bn 1874).  They ran the Confectioner’s Shop and had two sons, George Edwin Junior (Bn 1907 D1924 aged 17) and William Albert (Bn 1909).

 

1911  Occupying 2 rooms, was George Dellow (Bn 1841 D1919) and his wife, Ellen (Bn 1842).  He had been employed at Crystal Palace Railway Station since May 1874 and in 1911 was on a weekly wage of 16 shillings at Crystal Palace Low Level Station.  In 1861, when he was 19, he was a lodger in the railway porter’s cottage, Grateley Station, Hampshire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residents

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Memories
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War
War Damage 

At 6:09pm on Tuesday, 11 July 1944, a V1 struck Anerley Road, outside the Crystal Palace Low Level Station in Crystal Palace Station Road, resulting in 11 deaths.  People had heard the V1 cut out and were running for the cover of a basement shelter, but did not reach it in time.  18 shops in Crystal Palace Station Road were demolished and there was a fire.  Another 8 shops and 7 houses severely damaged.

This part of the hill had already received V1 bomb damage the previous day at 6pm on 10 July, including the Paxton Arms Hotel public house in Palace Road, Palace Square, Belvedere Road and surrounding area, resulting in 14 deaths.

[information:  www.flyingbombsandrockets.com]

View up Anerley Hill with Crystal Palace Station Road on the right hand side.

 

[source: Facebook}

[source: Facebook}

Bomb damage 1944 – view from across Anerley Hill

towards Crystal Palace Low Level Station

 

 

WAR HEROES

3 Crystal Palace Station Road 

In 1901, Mr William James Warwick, aged 26 (Bn 1876) a Coachman, lived with his wife Beatrice (aged 21)(M1900).  In 1890, aged 15, he joined the Merchant Navy.

In 1911,William and Beatrice were living in Thornton Heath and he was a Motor Instructor/Mechanic and had eight children.

In 1915, when they were living at 60 Ridsdale Road, Anerley, he enlisted (Pte 130953) in the Royal Army Service Corp.  He was 5’ 7”, aged 39.  He attended the medical at 51 Church Road, Upper Norwood.

During WW2, their son, Pte S/148726, Royal Army Service Corp Albert Cecil Warwick (Bn 13 October 1906) was aboard the RMS Lancastria which was sunk under enemy attack on 17 June 1940.

RMS Lancastria [Source : Google]

RMS Lancastria was a Cunard British ocean liner requisitioned during WW2 by the UK Government.  During Operation Aerial, she was sunk on 17 June 1940.  Having received an emergency order to evacuate British nationals and troops from France, the ship was well in excess of its capacity of 1,300 passengers.  Estimates suggest that between 3,000 and 5,800 passengers died during the sinking, the largest ship loss of life in British maritime history, claiming more lives that the Titanic and the Lusitania combined.  It is also the largest single loss of life for British forces in the whole of WW2.

He is remembered at the Dunkirk Memorial, France.

9 Crystal Palace Station Road 

In 1911, lived Felix Vincent Alexander Pollon (Bn 1883 D1918 Flanders) aged 29.  He was the Manager of the Tailors shop.  He had one son, Frederick Albert (Bn 28 November 1909).  Also resident was Herbert Fitzsimons, Widower, aged 44, a Canadian Exhibition Commissioner.

Felix enlisted in the Army Cyclist Corp aged 32, when he had been a Waiter, living in Stockwell Park Gardens in 1915 and later joined the East Yorkshire Regiment, 10th Battalion.  He was wounded on 25 April 1918 and on 30 July 1918, he was promoted to Sergeant.  Regimental No: 36626, formerly 11287, ACC.  He was 5’ 7”.

He was Killed in Action at Flanders, on 30 September 1918, aged 35.

He left behind Widow, Louisa (M 1 January 1907) and three sons, Frederick Albert (Bn 28 November 1909), Phillip Albert (Bn 14 February 1911) and Robert (Bn 27 July 1917).

He is buried at Underhill Farm Cemetery, Comines-Warneton, Arrondissement de Mouscron, Hainaut, Belgium.

Penge Roll of Honour

July 1919

Listed on the Penge Roll of Honour for Crystal Palace Station Road, two names are credited:

Pte Robert G Reed, Artists’ Rifles

Pte Ezra Moore, Army Service Corp.  He was a Motor Cab Proprietor at 9 Crystal Palace Station Road

1915 Directory