Cintra Park



Cintra Park was first known as Talavera Road, a road running from Belvedere Road to Anerley Hill, opposite an entrance to Crystal Palace Park. Its name was changed from Talavera Road between 1861 and 1870. The road first became residential at least by the early 1860s (No 8) (Now No 28) “Kenwyn” was built in, or by 1862) and by 1871, only a few houses had been built, and these were of varying Victorian styles and were only given house names, before being numbered. The road became popular by the well-do-do, probably due to its very close location to the Crystal Palace. As the road became more and more residential, numbers replaced the names and a few years down the line, even the numbering changed on one side (even numbers).

Maps and Land Ownership

Rocque’s Map 1746 – Where the dot is, is now Milestone Road/Cintra Park
It shows Penge and Elmers End (bottom right) and also Sydenham, Croydon and Dulwich

 

1867 Map of Showing Cintra Park

 

Map showing Cintra Park from 1850s:1860s

 

1899 Sales Map for the Cintra Park Estate 1899 – courtesy of Bennett Welch Solicitors, Westow Hill, Upper Norwood

 
Timeline
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Building of the street
Cintra Park was first known as Talavera Road, and its name was changed between 1861 and 1870.  However, it seems both the names of Cintra and Talavera were named after battles.  The road first became residential at least by the early 1860s (No 8 “Kenwyn” was built in, or by 1862) and by 1871, only a few houses had been built, and these were of varying Victorian styles and were only given house names, before being numbered.  As the road became more and more residential, numbers replaced the names and a few years down the line, even the numbering changed on one side of the road as there was open land belonging to the large Cintra House Estate, a very large mansion house, which on the Census was ‘1 Church Road’.  Cintra House had acres of land that now consists of Patterson Road, Milestone Road and the middle section of Cintra Park where 1930’s houses now stand.  The land comprised at least, tennis courts, orchards and stables.  When the owners of Cintra House died, the house was demolished and the land sold for housing.

Cintra Park House Names and Numbers

Original House

Number

Original Name Other Names Given
SOUTH SIDE    
1 Egoline Westray House
3 Folkestone Villa 1860s Danesheld
5 Shorecliffe Villa 1860s  
7 Sandgate Villas 1860s  
9 Hillside 1860s  
11 Ravensburn/bourne 1860s  
13 Underhill  
15 Hythe Villa Marley
17 Warwick Villa / The Hollies 1860s The Geary Ladies School (c1911)
19 Glanywern Villas / Glenside  
21 Winterbourne 1860s  
23 Maybrook / Cintra Villa 1860s Hawthorn
25 The Oaks (demolished early 1960s)  
Pillar Box  
27 Hampden Lodge The Vicarage / Rosabella
29 Sandford House Wallgate House
31 Lockington  
33 Holme Villa  
35    
37 Drewton Lodge  
39    
41 Hill Lodge  
43 Rock House  
45 2 Wellington Villas  
47 1 Wellington Villas  
49    
51 Norfolk House Mowbray Nursing Home /

Boarding& Day School

NORTH SIDE    
2 Talavera House / The stables 1860s  
4 Burlingham  
6 Hope House 1860s  
8    (now 28) Kenwyn 1860s Spring Bank (1897)
10 (now 30) Arran Hill (1898)  
12 (now 32) Beaumont  
14 (now 34) Cintra Bank  
16 (now 36) Ellison House  
18 (now 38)    
20 (now 40) Strathgrave High Bank (newspaper sale)
22 (now 42) Fairview  
24 (now 44) Hillcrest Melbourne
26 (now 46) Salvation Army Rescue Home/Albert House (since rebuilt) Sandingham Hall
28 (now 48) Braemar House / Southview Villa (1860s) Weldon House

1860s = House was definitely in existence in the 1860s

Number 1 Cintra Park ((Egoline)

No 2 Cintra Park (Talavera)

2 Cintra Park Talavera House

3 Cintra Park (Danesheld)

3 Cintra Park

4 Cintra Park (Burlingham)

4 Cintra Park

Advertisement

MESSRS MANSELL & ROWE will Sell by Auction, at the mart, Tokenhouse Yard, E.C. on Wednesday, July 25th at Two o’clock, the capital Freehold Semi-detached Residence, known  at ‘Burlingham’, 4 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, containing nine bedrooms, fitted bath room, drawing rooms, breakfast room, kitchen and offices; good garden.  

Possession on completion, Rental value £55

May be viewed.  Particulars of E. Mossop Esq, Solicitor, 8 Fawkes Buildings, Great Tower Street, E.C.: L H Mortimer Esq, Solicitor, Colton, Devon; and of the Auctioneers, 47 Church Road, Upper Norwood, S.E>

One occupant of No 4 was Edward Deane, a Professor of Music

5 and 7 Cintra Park (Shoregate)

8 Cintra Park (Kenwyn) (Now 28 Cintra Park) Home of Marie Stopes

The sale of ‘Kenwyn’, No 8 Cintra Park – Norwood News, Saturday, 10 July 1897

CINTRA PARK , UPPER NORWOOD

Messrs Mansell & Rowe will Sell by Auction at the Mart, Tokenhouse Yard, London E.C, on Tuesday, 13th July at Two o’clock precisely, the capital long leasehold DETACHED RESIDENCE known as “Kenwyn” ,8 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, containing nine bedrooms, bathroom, drawing and dining-rooms, kitchen and offices and large garden.  Let to an excellent tenant at £70 per annum.  Lease, 95 years from 25th December 1862, at £10 per annum. May be viewed by permission of tenant.  Particulars and Conditions of Sale obtained at the Mart; of Messrs Baker and Higgs, Solicitors, 76A Chancery Lane, W.C; and of the Auctioneers, 47 Church Road, Upper Norwood, S.E.

9 and 11 Cintra Park

9 Hillside & 11 Cintra Park

10 and 12 Cintra Park

12 or 32 Cintra Park

13 and 15 Cintra Park

13 & 15 Cintra Park

14 Cintra Park (Now 34 Cintra Park)

15 Cintra Park

16 Cintra Park (Ellison) (Now 36 Cintra Park) Home of George Lacy Hillier

16 Cintra Ellison

17 Cintra Park (The Hollies)

17 Cintra The Hollies

18 Cintra Park (Macfarlane) and 20 Cintra Park

19 Cintra Park

19 Cintra Psrk – it used to have a ballroom

Glenside, and probably neighbouring houses, originally had a large ballroom included as one of the rooms.

19 Cintra Park

21 Cintra Park (Winterbourne) and 23 Cintra Park

21 left & 23 on right – Cintra Park

26 Cintra Park

26 Cintra Park – since demolished and rebuilt

27 Cintra Park

27 Cintra Park – The Vicarage

28 Cintra Park

28 Cintra Park was 48 Highview or corner with Belvedere

29 Cintra Park

29 Cintra Park – Sandford

31 and 33 Cintra Park

30 Cintra Park

31 and 33 Cintra Park

31 Cintra Lockington

32 Cintra Park

32, 30 and stopes house 28 – was 12, 10 & 8

33 Cintra Park

33 Cintra Park – where’s the lamp post gon

41 Cintra Park

41 Cintra Park – Hill Lodge or Holme Villa

43 Cintra Park

43 Cintra – Rock House

47 Cintra Park

47 Cintra Park – Cintra Hume

49 Cintra Park

49 Cintra Park

51 Cintra Park

51 49 47 Cintra Park

Sale advertisements for houses on sale in Cintra Park from the Norwood News

UPPER NORWOOD, CRYSTAL PALACE HILL

And nearly on a level with the building – Two capitally situate Residences at the corner of Talavera Road and known as Cintra Park Villa and Cintra Park Cottage.  The have extensive views and are well drained, healthy and conveniently arranged; the gardens are 150 feet deep; ample room for stabling and carriage house.

1870

CINTRA PARK, Upper Norwood, close to Crystal Palace – FURNISHED Family RESIDENCE containing dining and drawing rooms, seven bedrooms, bath, dressing, and box rooms, good kitchen, etc.  Capital garden.  Rent for 12 months £6 6s a week or £7 7s a week for six months.

1878

All original houses survive, with the exception of No 25 (The Oaks), which was a very large house which was left vacant c1960 onwards and fell into dilapidation and was eventually demolished.  A widow, Anna Dan Ward, once lived in the mansion, living on her own means.  The other house lost was No 26 (now No 46) which became a Salvation Army Rescue Home in the 1890s and has since been rebuilt.  1930’s houses fill the gaps between No 6 Cintra Park and what is now 28 Cintra Park.

BUILDER OF THE 1930’S HOUSES IN CINTRA PARK

The builder of many houses in Cintra Park and at least part of one side of Milestone Road, was Property Developer, Mark Bromet (Bn 1858 Whitechapel D1933 aged 74).  He purchased many of the lots of the Cintra land.  Mark married Jeanetta Sniders (Bn c1870 Melbourne, Australia) in 1891 Mile End.  Her father was Joseph Sniders Bn in Amsterdam in 1835 who married Esther (Bn 1839 Whitechapel D1919).  Joseph and Esther had at least 8 children.  He was a Merchant in Glass & China D1916 Hackney.  He left probate to his eldest son, Isaac Sniders of £217 16s 2d, a Cap Manufacturer.

In 1901, (aged 42) Mark and his wife, Jeanetta and family lived at 4 Upper Avenue Road, Hampstead.  They had three servants, Henrietta Clark (aged 40) (Domestic Nursemaid), Emma Batty (aged 30) (Cook) and Annie Newcombe (aged 20) (Housemaid).

In 1911, Mark Bromet (Property Developer) and his wife Jeanetta, were living in an 8 roomed house in St John’s Wood, and had a daughter Dorothy (aged 19) and a son, Marcus Joseph (Bn 5 July 1893) (aged 17) who was a Student – Architectural.  They had two Servants, husband and wife William Hemmons (aged 48 Bn Bristol) (General Domestic Servant) and Edith (aged 38 Bn South Norwood) a Domestic Cook.

Mark and Jeanetta’s son, Hero Marcus, went into WW1 and served as a Private in the 60th Battalion Canadians Service Number 457100.  He was Killed in Action, aged just 23, at Auvigny, France, on Christmas Day, 25 December 1916.

Jeanetta had the heartbreak of losing her father Joseph and her only son, Marcus in 1916.

Mark Bromet died the same year as the 1930’s section (now Nos 10 to 26) of Cintra Park, were completed, in 1933.

A deed dated 8 February 1909 made between (1) The several persons whose signatures are thereunder subscribed and again affixed being purchasers  of lots on the Cintra Park of The House Property and Investment Company Limited and (2) The House Property and Investment Company Limited (Vendors) by the parties thereto to observe and perform and fulfil all and every the covenants restrictions stipulations and agreements contained in the schedule thereto.

By a Deed dated 11 March 1927 made between (1) The House Property and Investment Company Limited (The Company) and (2) Mark Bromet (Mr Bromet)

the said Company is expressed but so far as only as it lawfully can do so to release Mr. Bromet and his successors in title and all and singular the lands assured to Mr. Bromet by the Deed dated 15 December 1921 (which included the land in this title) from the restrictions and stipulations set forth in the schedule thereto if and so far as such restrictions and stipulations were then subsisting and capable of taking effect.

Architecture
Architectural Features of Houses in Cintra Park

External Features

 

Internal Features

Street Furniture of Cintra Park

 

 

Significant Street Buildings

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Social History
It seems, looking at the census records, that Cintra Park became popular by the well-to-do, probably due to its very close location to the Crystal Palace, being The Fresh Air Suburb and its beautiful park, just across Anerley Hill, and the close proximity to Crystal Palace Railway Station (which was built in 1854 following the arrival of the amazing relocation of the Crystal Palace from Hyde Park between 1852-1854).  From the 1860s the residential area developed and grand Victorian houses were built along Anerley Road and surrounding roads. The occupants of Cintra from 1871 to at least 1911, were mainly Barristers, Attorneys, Solicitors, Surgeons, Clergymen, widows ‘living on their own means’, earnings through Dividends, Army Officers and even a Tea Merchant, many with East Indies connections.

1 Cintra Park

The only house in Cintra that still retains its house name is Egoline, at No 1.  Charles Hinds lived here, aged 66, with his wife and daughter in 1881, until at least 1911. Mr Hinds had his Income from Dividends.

There was also George J Suckling aged 47 (1881) a few houses along at ‘Ravensbourne’, who was also a Barrister and Samuel Boteler Bristow at either No 5 or No 7 (1871).

2 Cintra Park

Next to some stables, at No 2 Cintra Park, was a house, at one time, called ‘Talavera’, owned by a Miss Charlotte Robertson, a Lodging House Keeper and a Mr Henry Robertson (aged 50), a Watchmaker and Jeweller (1891) and in 1901, Charlotte (aged 57) and her sister, Mary Ann (aged 64). (ll originally born in Ipswich).

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT “Talavera House”, 2 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood

Having SOLD the above Freehold residence

MESSRS EASTMAN & DENNISS, F.A.I; are favoured with instructions to sell by Auction on the premises, as above, on Wednesday, 15th October at 2pm THE CONTENTS OF THE RESIDENCE

Catalogues (when ready) of the Auctioneers at their offices, `135a Anerley Road, SE20 and 81 Gipsy Hill, Upper Norwood, SE19 (Telephones: Sydenham 0014 and 0038)

On the 1911 Census was Herbert James Payne (aged 40 place of birth not known/ Middlesex), an Expert in Gems, his wife Annie (aged 42).  They had six sons, Herbert (aged 14), Christopher (aged 12), Roger (aged 11), Allen (aged 10), Geoffrey (aged 8) and Hugh (aged 1).  Allen Payne signed up aged 17 for WW1 at the Dispersal Unit at Crystal Palace.  They had one servant, Jessie Bradford (aged 19, place of birth not known/London).

3 Cintra Park

1891 Miss Ruth Norris (aged 31 in 1891) lived at No 3 Cintra Park.  She was originally from Brighton, Sussex.  No 3 had 13 rooms.

Mr Alfred Stollard (a solicitor), in 1911, lived at No 3 Cintra Park, with his wife and two sons.  They also had two servants, who were a married couple, Henry and Annie Avery.  Henry Avery was a ‘Kennelman’.  In 1901, Alfred, his wife and son, lived at No 18 Cintra Park where they had three servants.

Advertisement from the Norwood News

“Offer to parents a liberal and thorough Education for their daughters at a moderate cost, French Evening Class twice a week; terms on application.  French spoken during term hours”.

Vacancies for Boarders

Term commenced January 19th

4 Cintra ParK

One occupant of No 4, was Edward Deane, a Professor of Music (1881 Census)

5 and 7 Cintra Park

Samuel Botelier Bristowe QC (Bn 5 October 1822 – D 5 March 1897, aged 74)lived at 5 Cintra Park.  (See details under Cintra Park residents).

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Daily Telegraph 20 October 1869

UPPER NORWOOD – To be LET, FURNISHED, a SITTING ROOM and BED ROOM, three minutes’ walk from Crystal Palace.  Excellent cooking and attendance.  Moderate terms.  Address J.D., Sandgate Villa, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood.

Norwood News 1 December 1883

A LADY wishes to find a home by the year with another lady, or in a nice lodging where she can be lodged and boarded in Upper Norwood – Apply by letter to W., Sandgate Villas, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood.

8 Cintra Park

Marie Stopes was born on 15 October 1880 (Edinburgh) D 2 October 1958.  At six weeks old, her parents took Marie from Scotland and moved to London, where in 1880, her father bought No 8, ‘Kenwyn’ (also later known as Spring Bank), at what is now, 28 Cintra Park.  This house was built at least 1862. (see notes on Marie Stopes under Cintra Park and Notable Norwoodian residents)

During the early 1960’s, the actor BASIL SYDNEY (Bn 1894 D1969 aged 73) lived at No 8 Cintra Park.  His original passion was for the theatre, in London and on Broadway, New York.  He appeared in over fifty films such as Ivanhoe (1952), Treasure Island (1950) and Around the World in Eighty Days with David Niven (1956).

Other occupants of what used to be No 8 (Now No 28), (1905 street directory), Bernhard Wilhelm Kὔhn (a Mercantile Clerk).  Also, Herbert James Leigh-Bennett (1991 Census), a Merchant and Director of Companies, his wife, two sons, three daughters and two servants.

Advertisements

The sale of ‘Kenwyn’, No 8 Cintra Park – Norwood News, Saturday, 10 July 1897

CINTRA PARK , UPPER NORWOOD

Messrs Mansell & Rowe will Sell by Auction at the Mart, Tokenhouse Yard, London E.C, on Tuesday, 13th July at Two o’clock precisely, the capital long leasehold DETACHED RESIDENCE known as “Kenwyn” ,8 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, containing nine bedrooms, bathroom, drawing and dining-rooms, kitchen and offices and large garden.  Let to an excellent tenant at £70 per annum.  Lease, 95 years from 25th December 1862, at £10 per annum.

May be viewed by permission of tenant.  Particulars and Conditions of Sale obtained at the Mart; of Messrs Baker and Higgs, Solicitors, 76A Chancery Lane, W.C; and of the Auctioneers,

47 Church Road, Upper Norwood, S.E.

Alfred Chadwell (B1844 D1905), ‘fly proprietor’ at Cintra Park Stables.  A ‘fly’ was a one horse two wheeled light carriage.  He probably employed fly drivers for hire and usually owned the flys.  In 1891 he was living at The Stables, Cintra Park (aged 47) with his wife (M1872) Elizabeth, 18 year old son, Ernest, a letter carrier and daughter, Annie.  In 1911 Elizabeth (widow aged 73, she lived to be 96) has moved to 17 Camden Hill Road and her son Ernest (aged 37) is a Horse Cab Driver.

1910

Fred Aylett (Bn 1855 D1932) (M 1876 Emily Bn 1855) On the 1911 Census, he is a Domestic Coachman at the Cintra Park Stables.  In 1901 he was working at the Swan Stables, Westow Hill.

9 Cintra Park

REV SAMUEL AUGUSTUS TIPPLE (CLERGYMAN) (Bn 1829 D1912 ) Lived at Hillside’, No 9 Cintra Park (1871 Census aged 47) with his wife Clare (aged 40), sons Horace (aged 19, a tea Merchant’s Clerk, Frank (aged 12) and daughters, Gertrude (aged 14) and Maude (aged 4).  They had a 23 year old General Servant, Jane Haines from Devises.  He was a popular minister of the Central Hill Chapel at the top of Gatestone Road, which opened in 1852 (demolished in 1957). (see more information under Cintra Park residents)

10 Cintra Park

Occupants of No 10, Cintra Park ‘Arran Hill’ (1898 street directory) have included Edith Jane Spain.  Mrs Edith Jane Spain (Bn 1845 Chelmsford D1933 81 Anerley Road), lived originally at No 39 Cintra Park a Widow, aged 46, Living on her own Means.  She had been married to Henry Augustine Spain (D1888), who was an Accountant.  His father, Henry, had been a Linen Manufacturer.  Edith and Henry were married in 1875.  Also living at 39 Cintra Park with Edith in 1891, were her sons, Henry (Bn 1877) Lawrence (Bn 1878), Elsie Butler Spain (Bn 1879 D1970) (Butler had been her mother’s maiden name) and Edith Everell (Bn 1880).  They had two servants, Ethel Russell (aged 25 from Strood, Kent), who was the Governess, and Annie Cooper (aged 18 from Essex), who was their General Servant. By 1901, the Spains had moved to No 10 Cintra Park, a much larger house, which was named Arran Hill.  Edith (aged 56), now lived with their son Henry Augustine (aged 24), a Chartered Accountant, Edith Everell (aged 21), William Augustine (aged 19), a Stock Jobber and Leslie Ormonde (aged 18) a Stockbroker.  They also had a General Servant, Ellen Jessie Wood (aged 19 from Norfolk).(see more information under Cintra Park residents)

At No 10 (now No 30) Cintra Park in 1911, lived Eliza Stallard (aged 77 widow) (Bn 1834 Bristol), living on private means, her daughter Amy, a cousin and a niece, Hannah (50) a Teacher of Music, plus two servants Ellen (21) a Domestic Cook and Norah (16) a Servant..  Her husband had been the Reverend William Henry Stallard (B1831 D1872).

12 Cintra Park

Occupants of No 12, Cintra Park, ‘Beaumont’, have included Robert Stafford Edwards (1893 street directory), Caroline Robinson (1900 street directory).  Also, Charles William Crofts (1905 street directory).

12 Cintra Park

Occupants of No 12, Cintra Park, ‘Beaumont’, have included Robert Stafford Edwards (1893 street directory), Caroline Robinson (1900 street directory).  Also, Charles William Crofts (1905 street directory).

13 Cintra Park

MARTIN FARQUHAR TUPPER (Bn 17 July 1810 D 29 November 1889) was an Author and Barrister, who lived at ‘Trillorde Underhill’, No 13 Cintra Park (1881 Census), wife Isabella (aged 69), sons William (aged 36), Walter (aged 36), a Civil Servant for the GPO, daughters Ellen (aged 44) and Authoress and Margaret (aged 40) also an Authoress.  They had one Servant, Amelia Edwards (aged 34 from Bermondsey).  He was an English writer, poet and author of ‘Proverbial Philosophy’.   He also corresponded with Charles Dickens.

An earlier occupant of ‘’Underhill’ (1871 Census) was the Rev Henry D D Gehle (Bn 1806 Holland D1881).

14 Cintra Park

At No 14 Cintra Park (now No 34) lived Arthur James Whitten (Bn 15 March 1829 D1904).  His father William, had been a Cordwainer (real leather shoe maker) and his wife Agnes (Bn 1847 D 1900 aged 53).  Agnes is buried in West Norwood Cemetery.  Arthur Whitten was born in Oxford, but his wife and two sons and two daughters, Lionel, (Bn 1873), Violet (Bn 1875 D1923) Violet married a physician and surgeon, Arthur Saward and in 1946 were living at 47 Skeena Hill, Putney. Gerald (Bn 1876 D1945 in Australia), Sibyl (Bn 1878/79 D1952, Southend-on-Sea) and Hilda (Bn 1880) were all born in Barrackpore, India.

Many of the residents in Cintra Park from around the 1880s had connections with the East Indies.

In 1881, Agnes (‘An Officer’s Wife’) with three sons (Arthur, Bn c1871 in Calcutta, Lionel and Gerald, and two daughters Sibyl and Hilda (plus two servants/nurse, Sarah and Mary), were living in St Helier, Jersey.

By 1888, they were living at 14 Cintra ParkIn 1891 they had one servant, Mary Jupp, aged 19, from Sussex.  In 1901 they had a 19 year old servant, Elizabeth Davis.

Arthur James Whitten – In 1901, a widow aged 71, his occupation was a Retired Indian Civil Servant

It was published in July 1888, in the newspaper that Arthur Whitten of Cintra Park was one of the Directors and a Shareholder of The Comstock Mining Company Limited.  In 1889, he also held shares in Staffordshire Water-Gas Company Ltd

The Comstock is a lode of silver ore located under the eastern slope of Mount Davison, a peak in the Virginia Range in Nevada (then western Utah territory). It was the first major discovery of silver ore in the United States, and named after American miner Henry Comstock.

After the discovery was made public in 1859, it sparked a silver rushof prospectors to the area, scrambling to stake their claims. The discovery caused considerable excitement in California and throughout the United States, the greatest since the California Cold Rush in 1849. Mining camps soon thrived in the vicinity, which became bustling commercial centres, including Virginia City and Gold Hill

The Comstock Lode is notable not just for the immense fortunes it generated and the large role those fortunes had in the growth of Nevada and San Francisco. but also for the advances in mining technology that it spurred, such as square set timbering and the Washoe process for extracting silver from ore. The mines declined after 1874, although underground mining continued sporadically into the 1920s.

Arthur’s wife, Agnes – Died aged 53 in 1900 and is buried in West Norwood Cemetery.

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September 1899

General Wanted with good references; state wages; small family – Mrs Whitten, Cintra Park,

Upper Norwood, London

February 1919

WORKING Housekeeper reqd, by two ladies engaged in Govt. work, widow with child preferred – Write stating wages to Miss Whitten, 14 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood

Sibyl Dupri (Bn 1878) In 1911 (aged 33), she was a Shorthand Typist for Surveyors. She died in Southend-on-Sea in 1952, aged 73

Hilda Mary –(Bn 1880) During the First World War, she joined the QAIMNS, which was ‘Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nurse Service’, who served in countries such as France, India, East Africa, Italy, Mesopotamia and Egypt.  QAIMNS started twelve years before the outbreak of WWI, during a time of peace in the British Empire.  The Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Nursing Service replaced the Army Nursing Service (ANS) and the Indian Nursing Service (INS) by Royal Warrant in 1902, named in honour of Queen Alexandra.  By 1914, there were almost 300 regular members of QAIMS.  The main reason that there were few QAIMNS nurses was because of the strict rules in place at the time.  Personnel had to be single, aged over 25 years and of a high social status.  These restrictions were removed due to so many casualties during WWI. She had the rank of VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment) which was awarded a British War Medal and Victory Medal.

In July 1935, now numbered as No 34 Cintra Park, the contents of the Misses Whitten’s residence is For Sale By Auction.

Advertisement

MESSRS MANSELL & ROWE

By Order of the Misses Whitten, 34 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood MESSRS MANSELL & ROWE have received instructions to sell by Auction on the premises as above NEXT WEDNESDAY, 24 July 1935 at 2pm.

THE CONTENTS OF THE RESIDENCE including wardrobes, dressing tables, chest of drawers, bedsteads, Chinese lacquer work, table ebonised and ormolu mounted table, boudoir grand pianoforte by Hagspiel and Ruschpler, cello and other musical instruments, writing table, plated goods, Cantonese tea and dessert service, glass, carpets, tables, pictures, linen, books and other items.

On view Tuesday, 23 July between the hours of 10am and 4pm.  Catalogues may be obtained from the Auctioneers, 99 Church Road, Upper Norwood, S.E.19  Tel: Livingstone 0522

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27 April 1918

WORKING HOUSEKEEPER required by 2 ladies engaged in war work; widow with child preferred.  Write, stating wages, to Miss Whitten, 14 Cintra Park, Upper Norwood

15 Cintra Park

EDMUND WALLACE ELMSLIE (Bn c1818  D1889) lived at Hythe Villa’ No 15 Cintra Park (1871 Census aged 52) with his wife Theodore (aged 32) and daughters Theodora (aged 7) and Ida (aged 2).  They had three Servants, Caroline Higgs (aged 21), Cook, Alice May (aged 24), Housemaid and Matilda Bealey (aged 15), Nursemaid.  He was a British architect who designed the Great Malvern Railway Station.  He was born Maidenhead, Berkshire about 1818 and died at Enderley in Avenue Road, Great Malvern in 1889.  He was the son of James Elmslie (1779-1865) and Caroline Anne Foster (1793-1861). The family’s wealth derived from Edmund’s grandfather John Elmslie who held investments in sugar cane plantations in Jamaica. (see more information under Cintra Park residents)

At No 15 Cintra Park (ground floor flat), many years later, from around 1930, lived PATRICIA EMILY PERRY,otherwise known as, Madge Allsop ‘”Give Us a Badge Madge”, or Dame Edna Everage’s (Barry Humphries) ‘silent, long-suffering bridesmaid’.(see more information under Cintra Park residents)

17 Cintra Park

An early resident was GEORGE SCOTT DAVIE, a Surgeon, who died there on 7 May 1896. (Born 1835) (se more information under Cintra Park residents)

1887

Another gallant Army Medical officer has passed away in the person of Deputy Surgeon G.S. Davie who died at his residence The Hollies, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood.  General Davie was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh and after acting as assistant-surgeon to the contingent of Turkish Artillery during the Crimean War, he obtained an appointment as assistant surgeon in the Army Medical Department. He was engaged throughout the operations in the Malay States as Senior Medical Officer and in 1878-9 he served with the Peshawur Valley field force in the Afghan War, for which he was mentioned in despatches and was awarded the medal. General Davie was employed in the Egyptian War of 1882, taking part in the battle of Tel-el-Kebir, for which he was again recognised in despatches. In January 1883, he was advanced to the rank of Brigade-Surgeon and in May 1886, to take of Deputy Surgeon-General, when he was placed on the retired list. The late officer was the author of a delightful work entitled ‘The Garden of Fragrance’ and was also a contributor to many official publications.

DAILY TELEGRAPH 13 May 1896

HENRY CROSS GREEN (Bn1807 Birmingham D1884) –was a wholesale jeweller and lived at ‘The Hollies’, No 17 Cintra Park from at least 1871 and had premises in Hatton Garden.  He is on the 1871 Census (aged 64) with his wife Mary, (aged 60), daughter Eliza (aged 34) and two servants, Jane (Cook) and Eliza (Housemaid).

1884

GREEN – On the 14th inst., at The Hollies, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, Henry Cross Green late of 94, Hatton Garden, aged 78

Mr Arthur Brent also lived at 17 Cintra Park (1900), who wrote a letter of complaint in December 1900, saying that he had lately received a demand note for rates, and calling attention to the disgraceful and insanitary condition of the road.  Although it was a public road, nothing was ever done to it and he had had to employ labour to sweep the leaves.  This was disputed as ‘Cintra Park had not been taken over by the parish, nor was the parish responsible for it.  A road not taken over was not lighted and seen to in some respects, but the council was not responsible for it in the same way as for Anerley Road or other roads known as public roads’.

It was suggested that Mr Brent go to the Works and General Purposes Committee.  This course was agreed to.

No 17 was also The Geary Ladies School (c1911)

Norwood News, 11 May 1956

BOY RESCUES CAT TRAPPED IN A TREE

When Barry Griffiths (aged 13), Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, heard that a cat had been stranded in a holly tree for two days he decided to rescue it.

Passers-by who saw the rescue offered Barry money, but be refused it.

But Barry’s deed did not go unrewarded.  On Tuesday, during morning assembly at

Penge County Secondary School, he was presented with a book by the

Chairman of Penge Council (Coun. F.A. Smith) on behalf of the

Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

16 Cintra Park

GEORGE LACY HILLIER (Bn 6 June 1856 in Sydenham D 11 February 1941, London, aged 84) lived at Ellison’ 16 Cintra Park.  He was an English racing cyclist, a pioneer of British cycling, and an excellent all-around athlete. He was one of the founders of the Chichester and District Motorcycle Club and served as its president. He was a member of other sports clubs and was racing secretary of the London County Cycling and Athletic Club.  In 1891, he initiated the construction of the Herne Hill Velodrome, which was briefly the home of the Crystal Palace Football Club during WWI.(see more information under Cintra Park residents)

19 Cintra Park

On the (1871) and 1881, Mrs Caroline Leggett (aged 74) (widow) lived at No 19, with her daughter, Caroline (aged 38, Born in the East Indies).  They had a Domestic Servant and a Housemaid.  They still lived there on the 1891 Census. The husband of Mrs Leggett was Joseph Leggett, who had been a Major General.

Also at 19 Cintra Park lived James Laird Macfarlane was born in Paisley near Glasgow in 1936 (D1913).(see more information under Cintra Park residents)

20 Cintra Park

At No 20 Cintra Park ‘Strathgrave’, on the 1871 Census, lived an Attorney-at-Law (Retired), Andrew Van Sandau, (Bn 1796 Holland D1876) whose cases often went to the Old Bailey and reports written in the newspapers

1857 LIFE ASSURANCE

Just Published price 1s 6d

AN EXPOSITION by ANDREW VAN SANDAU Esq, Attorney-at-Law, of his experience as one of the assured in the “Alliance” British and Foreign Life and Fire Assurance Company, London, showing how it has happened that an assurance in that company has proved a Disastrous Investment and suggesting useful hints for the guidance of such persons as may be desirous of assuring their lives, in their selection of the office.

London : C.A. Bartlett, 32 Paternoster Row, and all Booksellers

From at least 1918, Maud Cutler, a corset maker and milliner, lived at No 20 Cintra Park.  In 1915, she lived at 12 St Auybn’s Road.

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Notice in Norwood News 20 February 1886 regarding Strathgarve, Cintra Park.

Short Notice.  Under Distress for Rent

CINTRA PARK – Genuine Household Furniture, Pianoforte, &c.

Mr W Bruce May will sell on the premises, Strathgarve, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, on Thursday, February 25 1886, at One o’clock precisely, the genuine furniture, comprising brass and iron French bedsteads and bedding, sheets, &c, mahogany chest of drawers, washstands, &c, handsome duchesse table and double washstand, chest of drawers, drawing room suites in walnut and ebony, in tapestry and plush, occasional tables, chairs, &c, 4ft walnut chiffonier, mahogany framed dining room suite, two chiffoniers, dining table, overmantels and chimney glasses, &c, full compass cottage pianoforte, hall furniture, kitchen requisites and usual effects.

May be viewed day prior to and morning of sale.  Catalogues of the Auctioneer,

45 Anerley Road, S.E.

1918

In 1920

21 Cintra Park

No 21 Cintra Park, the house of the left was original called Winterbourne.  Winterbourne originally had at least one large purple marble fireplace, but this was destroyed some time during the 1970s.  One early occupant (1871 Census) was a Mrs Agnes Hands (Cintra Villas B1812 Bengall East Indies D1872 Probate)  Her husband had been Colonel Frederick Wright Hands of the 105th Light Infantry/Colonel Commanding the 39th Madras Native Infantry (D1856 India). Their son, Robert Hands (Bn 1852 East Indies) was a lodger at 6 Portland Terrace, Woodland Hill, in 1881.  His occupation was Private Gentleman. They also had a daughter, Florence Helen Richardson Hands (Bn 1853 East Indies D1899), who married Simeon Harrison Hardy, an Army Captain in 1873 and lived at ‘Ryhope’, 4 Highland Road, Upper Norwood.

In 1881, Mrs Emma Scott (aged 82) lived at Winterbourne, living on Dividends and Annuity, with her daughter Emmaline (aged 60) a Teacher of Languages, and a granddaughter, Blanche, aged 25, an Art Scholar, who was born in Paris.

They had three Servants, Elizabeth (aged 35) a Cook, Emily (aged 37), a Ladies Maid and Sarah Keeble (aged 17) a Domestic Servant.  Sarah married a Police Constable, at Christ Church Gipsy Hill in 1890.  Her father had been a Farm Labourer.

In 1891, lived Mrs Sarah Godfrey (widow), aged 53, living on own means, with her daughter, Annie (aged 23 born in Cannanore, India) a Teacher of Singing (school), sons Herbert (aged 18 Bn in Torquay D1903), a Clerk Chartered Accountant and Harry (aged 15 Bn in India) a Naval Cadet and later became a Vice Admiral/Commander in the Royal navy, niece, Blanche Rowlandson (aged 27), a Domestic Companion, and two servants, Ellen (aged 20), Cook, and Isabella (aged 16), a Housemaid.

On the 1911 at No 21, were Mr George Wilkins (aged 34 from New Cross) and Mrs Hannah Jane Wilkins (aged 56) and their two daughters (aged 23 and 24), plus Nellie, a General Domestic Service, aged 24. .  Mr Wilkins was a Chartered Accountant.

22 Cintra Park

No 22, Fairview, was up for sale, with contents in October 1920.

23 Cintra Park

The house on the right (No 23) was once known as Cintra Villa.  Later, it was also known as Hawthorn and originally had a row of hawthorn trees to the rear.  Only one hawthorn tree remains to this day.

In 1891, John and Mary Ann von Haclet (both aged 48) lived with one Domestic Servant, Ann Martin (aged 19).  John von Haclet was born in Hamburg and was an East India Merchant.

24 Cintra Park

No 24 Cintra Park was known at ‘Hillcrest’ and one family of residents on the 1891 Census, was Peyton Phelps (Bn 1839) who was a Retired Colonel Bombay Royal Engineers (Army), his wife and three sons and three daughters.  The four eldest were all born in the East Indies.  The daughters, Nina (a vocalist), Rachel (a harpist), Lucy (a violinist).  Their eldest son, William Peyton Phelps (Bn 1866 Kurrachee (Karachi) India, where he lived until he was five years old). In 1883 he went to Cambridge studying mathematics and where for sport, he rowed and rode.  He graduated with mathematical honours in 1886.  In 1894 William Peyton Phelps was appointed Assistant and then Principal Officer Actuary of the Equity and Law, a post he held until 1930.

In 1903, he took part in the formation of the Gallio Club, for Actuaries. (An actuary is a business professional who deals with the measurement and management of risk and uncertainty).

William Peyton Phelps

 

25 Cintra Park

No 25 Cintra Park was known as The Oaks, and was a very large house with generous grounds.  The original owner put it up for sale, with the contents in 1874.  It was built earlier than 1871, probably mid-late 1860s.  Large trees stood in front of it.  The next occupants (1881 Census) were Mr John & Mrs Anna Dan Ward (Bn 1831 D1906).  John Ward (Bn 1816 Java – an island of Indonesia D1892) was a Retired Master Mariner.  On the 1891 Census they have a Servant and a Housemaid (both aged 22).  After the death of Mrs Anna Dan Ward, the house and contents were again up for sale.

In 1911, there was Mr John and Mrs Justine Chansay and their family, all born in Switzerland.  Mr Chansay, was a Director of Companies.  They had a Governess (Minnie, aged 22), a Cook (Emma, aged 51) and a Housemaid (Lily, aged 22).

Miss Evelyn M Calvert, was the last occupant of the large 25 Cintra Park.  Unfortunately, it fell into disrepair and was eventually demolished (1960s) and four new houses now occupy the site.

Advert

Norwood News October 1874

UPPER NORWOOD – CINTRA PARK near the High and Low Level Stations.

Messrs Mansell & Rowe have received instructions from the owner to Sell by Auction, upon the premises, The Oaks, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood on Wednesday and Thursday Nov 11th and 12th, at Eleven for Twelve o’clock, the whole of the well-made useful Furniture and Effects, comprising mahogany and japanned iron Arabian bedsteads and bedding, blankets, a 4-ft Spanish mahogany gentleman’s wardrobe and usual bedroom appendages, rosewood drawing-room suite, covered in amber silk and curtains to match; handsome 5ft 6in walnut wood cabinet inlaid, two cottage pianofortes, a 4ft Spanish mahogany bookcase rosewood, loo, card and work tables, 14-day time-piece, in ormolu case; chimney glasses and ornaments; mahogany dining-room suite in green Morocco; extending dining table, Spanish mahogany pedestal sideboard; dinner waggon Brussels carpets, fenders and fire-irons, engravings, oak library table, 300 vols of books, rosewood chiffonier and bookcase, sewing machine, china dinner and tea services, cut glass and the usual kitchen requisites, garden seat, tools, a few dozen choice Port, vintage 1838, and numerous items.

On view day prior and morning of sale; Catalogues on the premises and the Auctioneers, 1 Belvedere Road, Upper Norwood, S.E.

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Norwood News 11 December 1875

WANTED a cook from about Christmas–Apply or address A.B. The Oaks, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood

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1893

FORMAL

Messrs Eastman Brothers (99 Croydon Road, Penge) and Messrs Poole and Son (The Oaks, Cintra Park, Penge) gave notice as to the construction of water closets at those addresses.

In 1911, there was Mr John and Mrs Justine Chansay and their family, all born in Switzerland.  Mr Chansay, was a Director of Companies.  They had a Governess (Minnie, aged 22), a Cook (Emma, aged 51) and a Housemaid (Lily, aged 22).

Miss Evelyn M Calvert, was the last occupant of the large 25 Cintra Park.  Unfortunately, it fell into disrepair and was eventually demolished (1960s) and four new houses now occupy the site.

Telephone Directory 1957

26 Cintra Park

No 26 Cintra Park ‘Albert House’, and ‘Sandford’ No 29 Cintra Park

South London Press, Saturday, 2 July 1887

CINTRA PARK, UPPER NORWOOD

In the High Court of Justice, Chancery Division, “Markwell v Scott” – To be SOLD by AUCTION, pursuant to an order made in the above action, and with the approbation of his Lordship, Mr Justice Chitty, by MR THOMAS MAY (the person appointed by the said Judge), at the Mart, Tokenhouse Yard, E.C. on Wednesday, July 20, 1887, at 1 o’clock precisely, in two lots, Two long Leasehold Houses, being ALBERT HOUSE AND SANDFORD HOUSE CINTRA PARK, UPPER NORWOOD, representing a total net rental value of £183 per annum.  Albert House contains 10 bedrooms, two dressing rooms, four reception rooms, and domestic office on same level, situate on summit of hill commanding very extensive views; Sandford House contains 10 bedrooms, dressing room, five reception rooms, and domestic offices, no basement; very pleasantly situated overlooking park; both houses are within a few minutes’ walk of the Crystal Palace and stations L.B and S.C and L.C and D Railways.

Particulars and conditions of sale of Messrs Rundle and Hobrow, Solicitors, 80 Coleman Street, E.C; Messrs Nash, Field and Withers, Solicitors, 12 Queen Street, E.C; Messrs Stuckey, Son and Pope, Solicitors, 4 Princess Place, North Street, Brighton; and of Mr Thomas May, Auctioneer, 111 Anerley Road, Anerley, S.E.

Albert House’ No 26 Cintra Park, was purchased by the Salvation Army Rescue Home (opened in 1889), for unmarried mothers.  Also known as ‘Sandingham Hall’ and originally was an Industrial Home.

By 1891, the Salvation Army Rescue Home, was occupied by a Head Officer, Miss Harriett Field (aged 36) and six other female Salvation Army Officers/Preachers with ages ranging from 21 to 34 years old.  The Census recorder described the 25 unmarried girls and their new-borns as ‘Inmates’.  The youngest ‘inmate’ was 16 and the eldest 28 years old.

Salvation Army The Deliverer – via Google

In 1901, The Head Salvation Officer was Miss Jane Sharples (aged 41) with six Salvation Army Matrons, with ages ranging from 22 to 43.  Inmates at this time were 26 General Servants plus Domestic Cooks, all unmarried, but no babies listed, with ages ranging from 12 to 40.

The women receiving help from the Salvation Army’s maternity services included women and girls from all walks of life fallen into hard times, whether falling pregnant from a promised marriage or otherwise.  Their presence in the home was twofold, as ‘girls who are about to become mothers, and whom it is not advisable to send to the workhouse and their need is the opportunity for the Army nurses to study midwifery.’ It was also recognised that it was possible for women from any station and any background to find themselves pregnant and unmarried.  General William Booth’s daughter-in-law, Florence Booth, opened the very first Mother and Baby Home in Hackney.

The Salvation Army’s publication ‘The Deliverer’ as one example statement says “What would have become, for instance, of F___, a small, frail girl of seventeen, an orphan, without a friend in the world, led astray by a married man while seeking another situation, and only forsaken to struggle alone with her difficulty’.

SALVATION ARMY RESCUE HOME MOVING FROM CINTRA PARK

ARTICLE IN THE NORWOOD NEWS – SATURDAY, 28 OCTOBER 1905

For fifteen years the Salvation Army have had an industrial home at Cintra Park Upper Norwood and carried on, in an unostentatious manner, a most useful work.  Probably very few residents in Upper Norwood knew anything of the tenants of ‘Albert House’, probably considering it is to be a private residence.  Viewed from the exterior, there is nothing to indicate that the premises are used as an institution for befriending girls, and the neighbours evidently have not had the slightest cause for complaint of any kind.

But during these fifteen years the work of the institution has grown, and today a ‘To Let’ board notifies the removal of this haven of help.

Fortunately, for the moral welfare of the odds and ends of womankind who find sanctuary and timely succour within the friendly portals of this and similar institutions founded by the Salvation Army and officered by an experienced and devoted sisterhood of matrons and nurses, the closing of ‘Albert House’ has no more serious significance than the transference of the Home of Refuge from the restricted dimensions of the Cintra Park premises to a more suitable and commodious habitation on Sydenham Hill, known as ‘Southwood’, which by the kindness of two friends and admirers of General Booth and his stirling services to the community at large, has been purchased for the purpose.  It is expected that ‘Southwood’ will be ready for its new and benign use directly after Christmas.  In the meantime a considerable amount of repairs and alterations are absolutely needed.  Contributions towards this immediate outlay are urgently asked for, and may be sent to Mrs Booth at the headquarters of the Women’s Social Work of the Salvation Army, at 249 Mare Street, Hackney, or to the lady principal of Albert House, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, both of whom will gladly explain the character of the benevolent work carried on.

It has already been mooted that residents in the neighbourhood of ‘Southwood’ do not altogether appreciate the idea of the institution coming in their midst.  Discussing this point with Commissioner Cox at the headquarters at Hackney, on Tuesday, our representative was assured that the residents in the district need have not apprehension on the score of annoyance.  ‘Southwood’ in the same way as Albert House, Cintra Park, has retained its name and there will be no additional ‘label’ of any kind attached.  It was very cogently pointed out by Commissioner Cox that it would defeat the very object of the work were it otherwise.   “We want those for whom the homes are provided to feel not that they are in an institution, but rather that they are, in every sense of the word, ‘at home’ and to learn more of self-respect and to gain higher ideals than they have hitherto had. No, ‘Southwood’ will remain as it is to the outside world, excepting that the ‘family’ occupying it will be larger than formerly.  If larger, however, they will give no one trouble, and within a short time of its re-opening we doubt if anyone will have reason to know that ‘Southwood’ is not as much a private residence as the houses around.”

“Look”, said Commissioner Cox, “through that album of view.”  It was a bulky one, and within were photographs of the principal of the Salvation Army’s 25 homes in different parts of the country.

“I want you,” said the Commissioner, “to notice this: that most of these institutions are in what were private mansions and stand in their own grounds, or else are large first-class residences, and that they are all in the best pats of several towns.  In some instances, as at Sydenham at the present time, objections were raised at first to our coming, but now we are there, no complaints are ever made.  We do our work in a quiet way, give no trouble to neighbours, and that is precisely what will happen at ‘Southwood’.

You might state,” added the Commissioner, “that if only the residents of the district will have patience, we will, in our own interests and that of the inmates, see that there is no cause for grievance.  Because we are the Salvation Army, it does not follow that we must have the band and the drum.  As I have already said, that would defeat the purposes of these homes.  To do the good we want them to accomplish, they must be carried on as ‘family residences’ would be.

“Please tell your readers, too, that the annual meeting of the Women’s Social and rescue Work will take place on November 20th, at the Cannon Street Hotel, and that we shall be glad to see many Norwood, Sydenham and Streatham people there; also please ask for donations for this most difficult, but encouraging work.

With this the interview closed.  The reasonable assurances by the Commissioner should tend to remove all imaginary grounds for anticipated difficulties and smooth susceptibilities of even the most sensitive of Sydenham’s rank and fashion.

General William Booth’s eldest son, William Bramwell Booth (8 March 1856 – 16 June 1929) (who married Florence), was the first Chief of Staff and the second General of the Salvation Army, succeeding his father.  He is on the 1901 Census for 26 Cintra Park, which was the Salvation Army Rescue Home (Albert House).

He was born in Halifax, Yorkshire, the oldest child born to William Booth and Catherine Mumford,  he had two brothers and five sisters. The Booth family regularly moved from place to place as William Booth’s ministry necessitated until the family finally settled in London in 1865.  Bramwell Booth was involved in The Salvation Army right from its origins as the obscure Christian Mission, established in Whitechapel in 1865, into an international organisation with numerous and varied social activities. He was educated at home, briefly at a preparatory school and at the City of London School where he was bullied.

In 1881, General William Booth appointed Bramwell as his Chief of Staff of the Salvation Army.  Bramwell would hold this title until his father’s death, when he himself was named General in his father’s will. In 1885 Bramwell was involved with William Thomas Stead in an attempt to publicise the prostitution of young girls. The lurid revelations of how thirteen-year-old Eliza Armstrong was sold for £5 resulted in the 1885 Criminal Law Act which raised the age of consent to sixteen years. After the revelations, Booth, Stead, and Rebecca Jarrett, a converted brothel-keeper who assisted them, were arrested on several charges.  Booth was acquitted but the others served short prison terms.

The early years of Bramwell Booth’s Generalship were complicated by World War 1, which threatened the international nature of The Salvation Army, with Salvationists in both Germany and Great Britain.  However, he was able to steer a course that offended neither the Germans nor outraged British public opinion, saying in his Christmas message of 1915, “Every land is my fatherland, for all lands are my Father’s”.

In his seventies he was suffering from poor health and would not retire, so The Salvation Army’s ‘High Council’ was convened for the first time in 1929.  The council resolved that Bramwell Booth was “unfit on the ground of ill health” and proceeded to elect Edward Higgins as General.

Bramwell Booth died on 16 June 1929, four months after the election of General Higgins.

On the 1901 Census, for the Salvation Army Home, was a Cook/Domestic (single), 30 year old Clara Fairburn (Bn 1870 Nottingham).  (Her family remained living in Nottingham).  Her father Amos, a Soda Water Bottler, later a Grocer (aged 38 D1911 probate £758 16s 7d, which he left to three of his sons), her mother Mary (aged 37 D1914).  Amos and Mary were married in 1862.  Mary and her two eldest daughters, Ann (married a Cardboard Box Cutter in the Lace Industry) and Matilda, were all Box Makers/later Hosiary Hands.  Clara was one of nine (four brothers and four sisters).

In 1891, Clara is an Inmate and Kitchen Maid/Domestic, aged 20. ‘Neither employed or unemployed’ in the Nottingham Workhouse.  There are no records saying why she moved to Cintra Park Salvation Army Home (1901 Census) and records suggest that she was not an unmarried mother, but in 1902 Clara had moved back to Nottingham, where was admitted to Nottingham Asylum (also known as The Southwell House Girls Rescue Home from 1883) on 7 April 1902.  She died, aged just 33 on 11 January 1904 at her father’s address at 11 Colwick Street, of Exhaustion from Melancholia (two years).

[with kind permission of The Salvation Army International Heritage Centre]

27 Cintra Park

In 1871, 1881 and also the 1891 Census, Mrs Ann Blackborne (widow) (D1906) resided at 27 Cintra Park, living on own means with two servants.  She married Anthony Blackborne (Bn 1824 Essex D1878 aged 54 and buried in West Norwood Cemetery), a Laceman/Merchant, in 1852 (A dealer in lace collected it from the makers, usually only those who had bought his thread, and sold it in the lace markets).  In 1861 they were living in Great Audley Street, W1 with four young sons and fifteen Assistants and Servants.  On the 1871 Census he was Head of Household at 35 Great Audley Street and in 1878 he had been living in Lawrie Park Road, so it is possible that Ann and Anthony had separated.  His father had been a Farmer, and her father had been a ‘Gent’.

On the 1891, 1901 and 1911 Census at No 27, John Johnson (Bn 1827 D1918) lived with his wife Mary.  He was a Retired Farmer.  In 1911, Mary (aged 74) had a Companion, Alice, aged 33.

On the 1939 Census, No 27 Cintra Park, was a Vicarage.  Henry Martin (Bn 1879 D 1956) was a Presbyterian Church of England Minister (believed to be the church on Westow Street).  He lived at No 27 with his wife Isabella (Bn 1879 D1967), sons Henry (Bn 1908 D1979), a Bank Clerk, and Eric Joseph (Bn 1917 D2010) Student-Dental Surgery Guy’s Hospital.  During WW2 Eric joined the Army Dental Corps and became a Japanese Prisoner of War (Service No 116798).  Also living at No 27, was Iris Stedman (Bn 1888 D 1968), a Teacher.(Information courtesy of Geraldine Cooper a descendant)(see more more information under Cintra Park residents)

28 Cintra Park

This was one of the very first houses built on Talavera Road/Cintra Park, on the corner of Belvedere Road (also known as 43 Belvedere Road) (1891).   Now Number 48 Cintra Park.  One resident lodging in 1891 was Dressmaker, Rebecca Guthrie.

29 Cintra Park

GEORGE KIFT WINTER M.I.C.E. F.R.A.S., (Bn 7 March 1842 D17 January 1898 in Madras).  Educated at the Godolphin School in Hammersmith.  He was a Telegraph Engineer of the Madras Railway, of Arakkonam, in the Presidency of Madras, British India.  He was acknowledged for his invention of ‘improvements in electric telegraphs’ (1873).  He lived at Sandford’ No 29 Cintra Park in 1881, aged 39 ‘A Telegraph Engineer’ with his wife Florence, aged 36 (Bn in Wales), and his three children, who were all born in Madras, E Indies, sons George B (aged 11) an Ernest (aged 2) (became a Civil Engineer and moved to Derbyshire) and daughter Amy (aged 5), and servant Ann Hovins(aged 26).(see more information under Cintra Park residents)

31 Cintra Park – Henry Oswin – Wine Merchant (1901)

33 Cintra Park

There was the Eagle family at No 33 Cintra Park.  (In the 1911 the Census Summary Book, it states ‘Eagle/Refused Information, but there was one male and five females in occupancy).  It would be good to prove that the above newspaper article was true at any time.  Blondin had wheeled people across a tight rope on more than one occasion.  Blondin was well known for his dare-devil stunts.

In 1861, Blondin first appeared in London, at the Crystal Palace, turning somersaults on stilts on a rope stretched across the central transept 70 feet (21m) from the ground.  After a period of retirement, Blondin reappeared in 1880 and starred in the 1893/94 season of the Jack and the Beanstalk pantomime at the Crystal Palace, organised.

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Norwood News – Saturday, 24 August 1912

DEATH OF A BLONDIN’S ASSISTANT

The death took place on Friday of last week of Mr Tom Eagle of Cintra Park.  The deceased had for years been employed at the Crystal Palace and is said to be the man whom Blondin once wheeled across the tight rope at the Palace.

43 Cintra Park

In 1911, at ‘Rock House’ No 43 Cintra Park, a twelve roomed house, lived the Foreman family (got photo). The father George (aged 53), was a Compositor (Hand) (LSC ) A compositor was responsible for setting up the type text into a composing machine.  He was from Bury St Edmunds and his wife Elizabeth, who he married at Christ Church Gipsy Hill on15 December 1883.  She was from Kingsdown, Deal, Kent.  They lived there with his sister, Emma (aged 510, who was a Lady’s Costumier.  George and Elizabeth had three daughters, Dora, aged 25, Alice (a nurse in training at the Cheyne Hospital, Chelsea) and Kathleen (aged 14) one of which Sidney Victor (aged 22), went to WW1 in 1915, aged 27, but survived.  He was married when he joined up, to Grace and was a Motor Driver Mechanic by trade.  The other son was 17 year old John, who was an apprentice at sea (merchant service Aberdeen Line).   Before living in Cintra Park, in 1891 & 1901, the family were living at 12 Palace Road.  Also, living with them at No 43 was Elizabeth’s mother, aged 82 and two boarders, Edward Doctrich (aged 18)who was originally from Paris, and Robert Kettle (aged 30), a military tailor/cutter.

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Norwood News 24 September 1915

BOARD RESIDENCE or Apartment – Mrs Foreman, Rock House, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood

The Foreman Family 1897

(photo from Ancestry.com)

The Foreman Family 1897

47 Cintra Park

One occupant of No 47 Cintra Park (Wellington Villas) was Alfred (Bn 1819 D 1886) and Mary Ann Diggles (Bn 1822 D1895).  Mary Diggles is still at this address on the 1891 Census (since by 1871).  Alfred Diggles was an Attorney and Solicitor.

49 Cintra Park

In 1891 at No 49 Cintra Park Mr Frederick Bullock (aged 47) a Druggist/Chemist lived with his wife Mehora (aged 42) and their three sons, William (aged 12), Charles (aged 9) and Percy (aged 5).  They had lodgers, Mr Phillip Justice (aged 72) and his wife Helen. He was a General Merchant from Philadelphia USA and was a Quaker. They also had lodgers, Eliza Booth (Widow Bn 1827) living on her own means and Annie Booth (aged 32), and Ethel (aged 27).

There were Housemaid Domestic Servants, possibly twin sisters, Alice Dodds (aged 23 born in Lee), Fanny Dodds (aged 23 born in Lee) and Annie Parker (aged 16 born in Marden, Kent), a General Domestic Servant.

51 Cintra Park

No 51, known as ‘Norfolk House’, which was one of the original houses built in Cintra Park, when according to an 1864 map Cintra Park was called Talavera Road.  No 51 became A School For Boarders and Day Boys, ‘Norfolk School House’ by the 1890s and later became a Boarding School for Girls by 1901.  Its early occupants included:-

  • John Smith 1868
  • Alfred Walden 1884
  • George Bulpett 1887
  • Clermont Livingston (a Shipping Agent)
  • Girls Boarding School (1901 – 1906) Clara Clements, (aged 30) (1901 Census) was one of the Teachers. Her father James Clements was the School Master, her sister Margaret (aged 25) was also a Teacher.

In 1894, an advert appeared in newspapers for ‘Norfolk House School’, Cintra Park:

“(Head Master Cyril E Simpson) advertised A School For Boarders and Day Boys, for the Sons of Gentlemen Only, between the ages of 6 and 16.  Teachers include Gold Medallist George Hawker.

A Lady thoroughly experienced takes charge of the very small boys at first.  The fee for this class is four guineas.  Preparation for the Army, Navy and Public Schools.  Special attention is also given to boys intended for a Commercial career.  The subjects taught comprise Scripture, Latin, Greek, Arithmetic, Euclid, Geometrical Drawing, Algebra, French, German, Science, Book-keeping, Shorthand, Drawing, Music &c.  The Head Master who a committed Solicitor, has special classes for boys intended for the Legal Profession.  A Master is always with the boys in and out of school.  Sole charge is taken of the boys during the holidays. Cricket, Football, Swimming, Riding, Gymnasium, Drilling, &c. Horse and Cobs are kept for the boys to ride and Riding Lessons are given. Day Boys can stay to Dinner with the Head Master if desired. Fees and References on application.  Term Commences 18th September 1894”.

In 1896, ‘Norfolk House School’, Cintra Park, “(Head Master Mr Lionel W Stanley’) advertised with the paragraph “Preparation for Public Schools, Cambridge Locals, College or Preceptors, Medical and Law Preliminary, and Other Examinations”. 

By 1902 it became a girls’ school.

Advert September 1907

Norfolk College

CINTRA PARK, UPPER NORWOOD

Term Re-Opens September 18th

Principal Miss Bellamy

Assisted by Certificated Staff

Juvenile and Adult Dancing Classes are being arranged

Fancy Dancing and Private Lessons by Madame de Gautier

Advertisement for 51 Cintra Park

Norwood News, 11 May 1956

BOY RESCUES CAT TRAPPED IN A TREE

When Barry Griffiths (aged 13), Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, heard that a cat had been stranded in a holly tree for two days he decided to rescue it. Passers-by who saw the rescue offered Barry money, but be refused it. But Barry’s deed did not go unrewarded.  On Tuesday, during morning assembly at Penge County Secondary School, he was presented with a book by the Chairman of Penge Council (Coun. F.A. Smith) on behalf of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

On the 1911 Census No 51 is called ‘Mowbray’ and had become a Nursing Home, run by Elizabeth Hamilton (Matron) aged 53 from Scotland, who was a Hospital Nurse. .  She was assisted by two trained Hospital Nurses, Miss Lillian Still (aged 31 from Sydenham) and Helen Hall (aged 26 from Lincoln).  One resident is listed as ‘In Nursing Home For Operation’.  The also employed a Cook, Lucy Nuberry (aged 41) and Ellen Reynolds, a Domestic Housemaid.

One occupant of No 51 Cintra Park, in 1935 was an Alice Fleetwood (Bn1862 D1940)

 

 

Residents

    Bristowe, Samuel Botelier (1822 to 1897)

    Lived at either 5 or 7 Cintra Park Samuel Botelier Bristowe was an English barrister and Liberal Party politician from Nottinghamshire.  He sat in the House of Commons from 1870 to 1880, and later became a Country Court Judge, surviving a murder attemp …


    Elmslie, Edmund Wallace (1818 to 1899)

    Lived at 15 Cintra Park (Hythe Villa) Edmund Wallace Elmslie llived at ‘Hythe Villa’ No 15 Cintra Park (1871 Census aged 52) with his wife Theodore (aged 32) and daughters Theodora (aged 7) and Ida (aged 2).  They had three Servants, Caroline Higgs (ag …


    Hillier, George Lacy (1856 to 1941)

    Lived at 16 Cintra Park George Lacy Hillier lived at ‘Ellison’ 16 Cintra Park.  He was an English racing cyclist, a pioneer of British cycling, and an excellent all-around athlete. He was one of the founders of the Chichester and District Motorcycle Cl …


    Macfarlane, James Laird (1836 to 1913)

    Lived at 18 Cintra Park James Laird Macfarlane was born in Paisley near Glasgow.  He studied at the Paisley Art School and then made his way to London to seek his fame and fortune. He may initially have been employed in fabric painting, but he soon fou …


    Martin, Reverend Henry (1879 to 1956)

    Lived at 27 Cintra Park On the 1939 Census, No 27 Cintra Park, was a Vicarage.  Henry Martin (Bn 1879 D 1956) was a Presbyterian Church of England Minister (was the church on Westow Street).  He lived at No 27 with his wife Isabella (Bn 1879 D1967), so …


    Perry, Patricia Emily (1907-2008)

    Lived at 15 Cintra Park From around 1930, lived Patricia Emily Perry otherwise known as, Madge Allsop ‘”Give Us a Badge Madge”, or Dame Edna Everage’s (Barry Humphries) ‘silent, long-suffering bridesmaid’. Emily was a familiar, friendly face in Cintra …


    Tipple, Reverend Samuel Augustus (1829-1912)

    Lived at 9 Cintra Park Reverend Samuel Augustus Tipple liived at ‘Hillside’, No 9 Cintra Park(1871 Census aged 47) with his wife Clare (aged 40), sons Horace (aged 19, a tea Merchant’s Clerk, Frank (aged 12) and daughters, Gertrude (aged 14) and Maude …


    Tupper, Martin Farquhar (1810 – 1889)

    Lived at 13 Cintra Park Martin Farquhar Tupper MARTIN FARQUHAR TUPPER (Bn 17 July 1810 D 29 November 1889) was an Author and Barrister, who lived at ‘Trillorde Underhill’, No 13 Cintra Park (1881 Census), wife Isabella (aged 69), sons William (aged 36) …


    Winter George Kift M.I.C.E. F.R.A.S (1842 – 1898)

    Educated at the Godolphin School in Hammersmith.  He was a Telegraph Engineer of the Madras Railway, of Arakkonam, in the Presidency of Madras, British India.  He was acknowledged for his invention of ‘improvements in electric telegraphs’ (1873).  He l …


    Winter, George Bliss (1869 to 1914)

    GEORGE BLISS WINTER (son of George Kift Winter) was born in India in 1869 (Died 1914, aged 45). He was educated in England, he returned to India in 1886, and served an apprenticeship under his father, George Kift Winter in the Telegraph Department of t …


Memories
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War
The First World War 1914 to 1918

WAR HEROES RESIDENT IN CINTRA PARK

PARIS VILLIER DRAKE-BROCKMAN born 1899 son of Paris Frederick (a Barrister) and Isabel Alice Drake-Brockman of 3 Cintra Park (‘Danesheld’).  He joined Rigaud’s House in 1912 and after served with the Artists Rifles before training at the Royal Military College at Sandhurst.  From there he obtained a commission as a 2ndLieutenant in ‘The Buffs’, The Royal East Kent Regiment.  He was Killed in Action in Flanders on 18 July 1918, aged 19.  He is buried Abeele Aerodrome Military Cemetery, Poperinge, Arrondissement Ieper, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium.

Paris Villier Drake-Brockman

CAPTAIN ARTHUR EDWARD PROSSER born 1883, son of Arthur Williams and Rosina Prosser of 3a Cintra Park.  In 1911 aged 27, was a clerk for the London, Brighton South Coast Railway.  He joined the Worcester Regiment C Coy 1st Btn.  He died on 23 October 1918 and is buried at Schoonselhof Cemetery, Belgium.

PROSSER, Capt. Arthur Edward M.C.

Medal & Mortality index

The Military Cross was instituted as a Decoration on December 28th, 1914, to reward Distinguished Services rendered by Officers of certain ranks in the army in time of war. Bars may be added for additional acts of gallantry. Since August 1st, 1918, it has, like the D.S.O., been awarded for “services in action” only. 

 

PROSSER, Capt. Arthur Edward … … … … 1/ Worcester 

  1. of OPPY, 7thOctober 1918.  During the afternoon he brought forward two of his platoons into the ROUVROY-FRESNES line, and led them through advanced troops which were hung up and captured a further 1,000 yards of the line.  He himself rushed two machine guns which were enfilading our troops, and captured seventeen prisoners.  His splendid example, courage and leadership enabled touch to be gained all along the line. Later in the evening he himself pushed forward into NEUVIREUL and captured two heavy trench mortars which had been causing many casualties to the battalion on his left.

 

Captain PROSSER, ARTHUR EDWARD

Died 23/10/1918

Aged 35

“C” Coy. 1st Bn
Worcestershire Regiment

M C, Mentioned in Despatches

Son of Arthur William and Rosina Prosser, of 3A, Cintra Park, Upper Norwood, London; husband of Ethel Calow (formerly Prosser).

LANCE CORPORAL HERBERT DERISLEY, was born on 23 January 1884 and joined the 17th Middlesex/Duke of Cambridge Own (Middlesex) Regiment in October 1915.  When he was 27, he was a tailor/draper and a boarder at 12 Woodland Hill.  He later lived at No 4 Cintra Park.  He was Killed in Action 1 June 1916.  His brother, Lance Corporal R M Derisley, died of wounds 5 November 1915.

Herbert Derisley WW1 hero

 

PRIVATE DOUGLAS WILLIAM IRONSIDE/30644, was the son of Edward (a horse dealer) and Alice Ironside of 23 Cintra Park (‘Cintra Villa’).  He was born in 1895 in Anerley and had two brothers and three sisters.  When he was 16 in 1911, was a baker.  He joined the East Surrey Regiment 1st Btn.  He was killed in Flanders on 8 May 1917 aged 23 and is buried at Arras Memorial.

PRIVATE CHARLES GEORGE HOLT was born 1884, son of Charles and Emma Holt, who lived at 31 Cintra Park (‘Lockington’).  He joined the Gloucestershire Rgt 1st Btn 34563.  He died, aged 34 on Saturday, 20 April 1918.  He is buried at Pernes British Cemetery.‘Lockington’, No 31 Cintra Park

MAJOR ARTHUR SINCLAIR VERNON HUME (Bn 6 July 1865 India) on a 1901 Street Directory lived at No 47 Cintra Park.  His father was Sir Gustavus Hume and his mother Lady Hume-Gore.  During WWI he joined the Household Cavalary & Cavalry of the Line – 3rd Scottish Horse (A.P.M IX Corps), where he became Major Arthur Sinclair Vernon Hume.  He was Killed on 21 September 1915, aged 50, leaving wife Blanche Mary Hume (M 1893).  He is buried at Helles Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey.

In 1901, the GARNER-SMITH family lived at 39 Cintra Park.  James Garner-Smith (Bn 1851 D1919 Brooklyn NY) was a Financial Agent and his second wife Louisa (Bn 1864 D1942) (M1891) and their two children, Eric John Garner Smith (Bn 1892 Sydenham).  In 1911 he was an Articled Clerk, and Gerard Wyle Garner-Smith (Bn 1893 Bristol D1949), who became a Bank Clerk and during WWI joined the Royal Air Force.

LIEUTENANT ERIC JOHN GARNER SMITH joined the 24th (County of London) Battalion (The Queens) London Regiment.  He was Killed at Givenchy, France 25 May 1915.  He is buried at Richebourg-l’Avoue, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France.

LIEUTENANT ERIC JOHN GARNER-SMITH, 1/24th (County of London) Battn, The London Regiment (The Queens) TF, was the eldest son of Mr & Mrs J Garner-Smith.

His family

Lieutenant Garner-Smith was born on 17 March 1892 at Sydenham, London and was educated at Holland House, Hove, Sussex and Brighton College, Sussex.  At both school and college he was a member of the OTC and he shot in the College Team at Bisley.  After leaving college he was articled to a London firm of Chartered Accountants and distinguished himself in the Final Examination of November 1913, when he was placed second in the Honours List.  He took an active part in connection with the Chartered Accountants’ Students’ Society of London, being Chairman of the Committee for the year 1914.  He was also a prominent member of the Hampstead Parliament.

On the outbreak of war with Germany, Mr Garner-Smith applied for a commission and in September 1914, he was gazetted 2 Lieutenant in the 24th Battalion London Regiment.  He was promoted Lieutenant in December 1914.  Lieutenant Garner-Smith passed the School of Musketry at Hythe, gaining a distinguished 1st Class Certificate and proceeded to Flanders in March 1915.  He was killed in action on the 25 May 1915, while leading his men in an attack on the German trenches at Givenchy and was buried on the field of battle.

The following account of his death was given by the Captain of his Company:  “ ‘A’ Company lost in the charge three out of five officers.  We, ‘B’ Company, lost two out of four, poor Garner being hit several times, once in the head, and his death must have been practically instantaneous.  As he was falling, he shouted pointing to the enemy’s trench: “That’s the way.”  The enemy trench was captured and held, although at the loss of nearly half the Battalion.

Lived at 14 Cintra Park

Hilda Mary Whitten –(Bn 1880) During the First World War, she joined the QAIMNS, which was ‘Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nurse Service’, who served in countries such as France, India, East Africa, Italy, Mesopotamia and Egypt.  QAIMNS started twelve years before the outbreak of WWI, during a time of peace in the British Empire.  The Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Nursing Service replaced the Army Nursing Service (ANS) and the Indian Nursing Service (INS) by Royal Warrant in 1902, named in honour of Queen Alexandra.  By 1914, there were almost 300 regular members of QAIMS.  The main reason that there were few QAIMNS nurses was because of the strict rules in place at the time.  Personnel had to be single, aged over 25 years and of a high social status.  These restrictions were removed due to so many casualties during WWI. She had the rank of VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment) which was awarded a British War Medal and Victory Medal.

Second World War 1939 to 1945

View up Belvedere Road.  Cintra Park is in the distance on the right hand side.

The houses on the right hand side have since gone due to WW2 bomb damage on 10 July 1944 at 17:57.  Green open space remains, leading to Palace Square.

A Bomb Report says: “This major incident occurred when the V2 fell on Palace Square and caused severe damage in both Palace Square and Belvedere Road.  8 houses demolished in the Square, and 2 in Belvedere Road.  53 severe damage in Belvedere Road. 175 houses and 4 shops slight damage in Palace Square, Belvedere Road, Anerley Grove, Cintra Park,

Waldegrave Road, Palace Road.  The area of damage in Belvedere Road can still be seen as the line of Victorian housing interrupted by a small recreation ground/open space.  Palace Square was completely re-developed in the 1970’s”.

A Bomb Report says: “This major incident occurred when the V2 fell on Palace Square and caused severe damage in both Palace Square and Belvedere Road.  8 houses demolished in the Square, and 2 in Belvedere Road.  53 severe damage in Belvedere Road. 175 houses and 4 shops slight damage in Palace Square, Belvedere Road, Anerley Grove, Cintra Park,

Waldegrave Road, Palace Road.  The area of damage in Belvedere Road can still be seen as the line of Victorian housing interrupted by a small recreation ground/open space.  Palace Square was completely re-developed in the 1970’s”.